The Oxford Illustrated History of Prehistoric Europe

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Oxford University Press, 2001 - History - 532 pages
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Ranging from the earliest settlements through the emergence of Minoan civilization to the barbarian world at the end of the Roman Empire, this extraordinary volume provides a fascinating look at how successive cultures adapted to the landscape of Europe. In synthesizing the diverse findings of archeology, Barry Cunliffe and a team of distinguished experts capture the sweeping movements of peoples, the spread of agriculture, the growth of metal working, and the rise and fall of cultures, blending superb detail with ornate illustrations.
For centuries, we knew little of the European civilizations that preceded classical Greece or arose outside of the Roman Empire, beyond ancient myths and the writings of Roman observers. Now the most recent discoveries of archeology have been synthesized into one exciting volume. Featuring hundreds of stunning photographs, this book provides the most complete account available of the prehistory of European civilization.
 

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Contents

The Upper Palaeolithic Revolution
42
3 The Mesolithic Age
79
4 The First Farmers
136
The Later
167
The Palace Civilizations of Minoan Crete and Mycenaean
202
Earlier Bronze Age Europe
244
The Collapse of Aegean Civilization at the End of
277
Reformation in Barbarian Europe 1300600 BC
304
Iron Age Societies in Western Europe and Beyond 800140 BC
336
Thracians Smhians and Dacians 800 BCAD 300
373
The Impact of Rome on Barbarian Society 140 BCAD 300
411
13 Barbarian Europe AD 300700
447
FURTHER READING
483
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF SOURCES 307
507
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About the author (2001)


Barry Cunliffe is Professor of European Archaeology at the University of Oxford. The author of over 40 books, including The Ancient Celts, published by Oxford University Press, he has served as President of the Council for British Archaeology and the Society of Antiquaries, and is currently a member of the Ancient Monuments Board of English Heritage.

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