From Manassas to Appomattox: Memoirs of the Civil War in America

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Da Capo Press, 1992 - History - 690 pages
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General James Longstreet is one of the most controversial figures of the American Civil War. According to some, he was partially to blame for the Confederate defeat at Gettysburg; according to others, if Lee had followed Longstreet’s advice, they would have won that battle. He has been called stubborn and vain; and he has been lauded as one of the greatest tacticians of the Civil War. All agree, however, that Longstreet was not only a dependable fighter but completely devoted to Robert E. Lee, who relied on him the most out of all his officers. He acquitted himself bravely in many of the war’s bloodiest battles, including those at Antietam, Chickamauga, and the Wilderness. And his staunchest defenders were always the men who served under him. Longstreet’s memoirs reflect the combative style of the old soldier. Their tremendous historical interest lies not only in his personal account of the progress of the Civil War, and in the many fascinating anecdotes about Lee and his officers, but in the insight they afford into the mind and character of one of the bravest and most loyal of southern generals.

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