Old and New Nottingham

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Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, 1853 - Nottingham (England) - 374 pages
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Page 182 - the antique oratory," will long call up to fancy the " maiden and the youth" who once stood in it ; while the image of the " lover's steed," though suggested by the unromantic race-ground of Nottingham, will not the less conduce to the general charm of the scene, and share a portion of that light which only Genius could shed over it.
Page 71 - I know not whither two or three others the governor had called to meat with him ; for which Captain Palmer bellowed loudly against him as a favourer of malignants and Cavaliers. Who could have thought this godly, zealous man, who could scarce eat his supper for grief to see the enemies of God thus favoured, should have after entered into a conspiracy against the governor with those very same persons who now so much provoked his zeal? But the governor took no notice of it, though he set the very soldiers...
Page 172 - HERE would I wish to sleep. — This is the spot Which I have long mark'd out to lay my bones in; Tired out and wearied with the riotous world, Beneath this yew I would be sepulchred. It is a lovely spot...
Page 71 - There was a large room, which was the chapel, in the castle : this they had filled full of prisoners, besides a very bad prison, which was no better than a dungeon, called the Lion's Den...
Page 63 - The castle was built upon a rock, and nature had made it capable of very strong fortification, but the buildings were very ruinous and uninhabitable, neither affording room to lodge soldiers nor provisions. The castle stands at one end of the town, upon such an eminence as commands the chief streets of the town.
Page 174 - The pale mechanic leaves the labouring loom, The air-pent hold, the pestilential room, And rushes out, impatient to begin The stated course of customary sin ; Now, now my solitary way I bend Where solemn groves in awful state impend : And cliffs, that boldly rise above the plain, Bespeak, blest Clifton ! thy sublime domain.
Page 259 - Surveys' are many of them imperfectly executed, but they were useful at the time, in developing more rapidly the agricultural resources of the country. During the years of scarcity at the end of the last and beginning of the present century, the...
Page 330 - ... jewels, and, for the better garnishing whereof, the townsmen use the day before to ransack the gardens of all the gentlemen within six or seven miles about Nottingham, besides what the town itself affords them, their greatest ambition being to outdo one another in the bravery of their garlands...
Page 74 - PutBey, who was possessed of a very large jointure, falling deeply in love with him, got him knighted, and married him ; but he living up to the extent of his apron-string estate, and his lady dying before him, Sir William returned to his former occupation, and the public recovered the loss of an eminent artist...
Page 32 - Creature, who came into the Shop with two Children following her in as dismal a Plight as the Mother, asking for a Pennyworth of Tea and a Half penny worth of Sugar, which when she was served with, she told the Shop-keeper: Mr N.

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