The Crack-Up

Front Cover
New Directions Publishing, 2009 - Biography & Autobiography - 347 pages
The Crack-Up tells the story of Fitzgerald's sudden descent at the age of thirty-nine from glamorous success to empty despair, and his determined recovery. Compiled and edited by Edmund Wilson shortly after F. Scott Fitzgerald's death, this revealing collection of his essays--as well as letters to and from Gertrude Stein, Edith Wharton, T.S. Eliot, John Dos Passos--tells of a man with charm and talent to burn, whose gaiety and genius made him a living symbol of the Jazz Age, and whose recklessness brought him grief and loss. "Fitzgerald's physical and spiritual exhaustion is described brilliantly," noted The New York Review of Books: "the essays are amazing for the candor."
 

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Contents

I
13
II
23
III
34
IV
41
V
56
VI
63
VII
69
VIII
85
XXVII
181
XXVIII
188
XXX
195
XXXII
211
XXXIV
212
XXXVI
230
XXXVII
231
XXXIX
234

IX
91
X
93
XI
94
XIII
95
XIV
102
XVI
122
XVIII
128
XIX
131
XX
146
XXI
154
XXII
157
XXIV
166
XXVI
175
XL
236
XLII
245
XLIII
286
XLV
308
XLVI
309
XLVII
310
XLVIII
311
XLIX
312
L
317
LI
323
LIII
338
LIV
344
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About the author (2009)

F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1941) was one of the literary titans of the 20th century. A member of the Lost Generation" of the 1920s, Fitzgerald's writings best captured what he termed "The Jazz Age," a period of declining traditional American values, prohibition and speakeasies, and great leaps in modernist trends.

Bibliographic information