The Evolution of Cooperation

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Basic Books, 1984 - Psychology - 241 pages
2 Reviews
The much-discussed book that explores how cooperation can emerge in a world of self-seeking egoists--whether superpowers, businesses, or individuals--when there is no central authority to police their actions."A remarkable mixture of theoretical analysis, anecdotal evidence, and a most unusual mode of empirical research...In it he applies the prisoner's dilemma to topics ranging from collusion among large corporations to U.S. involvement in Vietnam."--James L. Gould and Carol Grant Gould, "Sciences"

"A fascinating contribution to the theory of cooperation, and written in a clear, informal style that makes it a joy to read." "--Times Literary Supplement (London)"

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About the author (1984)

Robert Axelrod is Professor of Political Science and Public Policy at the University of Michigan. A MacArthur Prize Fellow, he is a leading expert on game theory, artificial intelligence, evolutionary biology, mathematical modeling, and complexity theory. He lives in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

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