Aluminum Structures: A Guide to Their Specifications and Design

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John Wiley & Sons, Oct 16, 2002 - Technology & Engineering - 544 pages
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On the First Edition:

"The book is a success in providing a comprehensive introduction to the use of aluminum structures . . . contains lots of useful information." -"Materials & Manufacturing Processes"

"A must for the aluminum engineer. The authors are to be commended for their painstaking work." -"Light Metal Age"

Technical guidance and inspiration for designing aluminum structures "Aluminum Structures, Second Edition" demonstrates how strong, lightweight, corrosion-resistant aluminum opens up a whole new world of design possibilities for engineering and architecture professionals. Keyed to the revised "Specification for Aluminum Structures" of the 2000 edition of the "Aluminum Design Manual," it provides quick look-up tables for design calculations; examples of recently built aluminum structures-from buildings to bridges; and a comparison of aluminum to other structural materials, particularly steel. Topics covered include: Structural properties of aluminum alloys Aluminum structural design for beams, columns, and tension members Extruding and other fabrication techniques Welding and mechanical connections Aluminum structural systems, including space frames, composite members, and plate structures Inspection and testing Load and resistance factor design Recent developments in aluminum structures

 

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Contents

PART II STRUCTURAL BEHAVIOR OF ALUMINUM
97
PART III DESIGN CHECKS FOR STRUCTURAL COMPONENTS
227
PART IV DESIGN OF STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS
335
PART V LOAD AND RESISTANCE FACTOR DESIGN
387
Appendixes
407
Glossary
503
References
519
Index
527
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

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Page 18 - ... ductility. This designation is applicable only to those alloys which, unless stabilized, gradually age-soften at room temperature. The number following this designation indicates the degree of strain-hardening before the stabilization treatment. 4.2.1.2 The digit following the designations HI, H2 and H3 indicates the degree of strain-hardening.
Page 21 - Applies to products which are not cold worked after solution heat treatment, or in which the effect of cold work in flattening or straightening may not be recognized in mechanical property limits.
Page 18 - Applies to products which are strain-hardened more than the desired final amount and then reduced in strength to the desired level by partial annealing. For alloys that agesoften at room temperature, the H2 tempers have the same minimum ultimate tensile strength as the corresponding H3 tempers. For other alloys, the H2 tempers have the same minimum ultimate tensile strength as the corresponding HI tempers and slightly higher elongation. The number following this designation indicates the degree of...
Page 18 - T THERMALLY TREATED TO PRODUCE STABLE TEMPERS OTHER THAN F, O, OR H — Applies to products which are thermally treated, with or without supplementary strain-hardening, to produce stable tempers. The T is always followed by one or more digits.
Page 17 - Basic temper designations consist of letters. Subdivisions of the basic tempers, where required, are indicated by one or more digits following the letter. These designate specific sequences of basic treatments, but only operations recognized as significantly influencing the characteristics...
Page 20 - Applies to products which are cold worked to improve strength after cooling from an elevated temperature shaping process, or in which the effect of cold work in flattening or straightening is recognized in mechanical property limits.
Page 20 - AND NATURALLY AGED TO A SUBSTANTIALLY STABLE CONDITION— Applies to products which are not cold worked after solution heat treatment, or in which the effect of cold work in flattening or strightening may not be recognized in applicable specifications.
Page 21 - Applies to products which are stress-relieved by compressing after solution heat treatment or cooling from an elevated temperature shaping process to produce a permanent set of 1 to 5 percent.
Page 18 - F as fabricated. Applies to the products of shaping processes in which no special control over thermal conditions or strain-hardening is employed. For wrought products, there are no mechanical property limits. O annealed. Applies to wrought products which are...

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About the author (2002)

J. RANDOLPH KISSELL and ROBERT L. FERRY, both registered professional engineers, are the founders of The TGB Partnership of Hillsborough, North Carolina, a consulting firm specializing in aluminum structural design

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