Slavery, Disease, and Suffering in the Southern Lowcountry

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Cambridge University Press, Apr 11, 2011 - History
On the eve of the Revolution, the Carolina lowcountry was the wealthiest and unhealthiest region in British North America. Slavery, Disease, and Suffering in the Southern Lowcountry argues that the two were intimately connected: both resulted largely from the dominance of rice cultivation on plantations using imported African slave labor. This development began in the coastal lands near Charleston, South Carolina, around the end of the seventeenth century. Rice plantations spread north to the Cape Fear region of North Carolina and south to Georgia and northeast Florida in the late colonial period. The book examines perceptions and realities of the lowcountry disease environment; how the lowcountry became notorious for its 'tropical' fevers, notably malaria and yellow fever; how people combated, avoided or perversely denied the suffering they caused; and how diseases and human responses to them influenced not only the lowcountry and the South, but the United States, even helping to secure American independence.
 

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Contents

talk about suffering
1
From Paradise to Hospital
18
A Scene of Diseases
39
Wooden Horse
61
Revolutionary Fever
84
Strangers Disease
106
A Merciful Provision of the Creator
125
combating pestilence
149
Providence Prudence and Patience
188
Buying the Smallpox
204
Commerce Contagion and Cleanliness
226
A Migratory Species
249
Melancholy
271
Bibliography
281
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Peter McCandless received his Ph.D. in Modern British and African History from the University of Wisconsin in 1974 and joined the history faculty of the College of Charleston that year. He received the college's Distinguished Teaching Award in 1985 and was named a Governor's Distinguished Professor in 1998. He is the author of Moonlight, Magnolias, and Madness: Insanity in South Carolina from the Colonial to the Progressive Eras (1996) and numerous journal articles.

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