The Augustan review

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Page 346 - THREE years she grew in sun and shower; Then Nature said, "A lovelier flower On earth was never sown ; This Child I to myself will take; She shall be mine, and I will make A Lady of my own. "Myself will to my darling be Both law and impulse : and with me The Girl, in rock and plain, In earth and heaven, in glade and bower, Shall feel an overseeing power To kindle or restrain.
Page 354 - When soft ! — the dusky trees between, And down the path through the open green, Where is no living thing to be seen; And through yon gateway, where is found, Beneath the arch with ivy bound, Free entrance to the church-yard ground...
Page 350 - Unoccupied by sorrow of its own, His heart lay open ; and, by nature tuned And constant disposition of his thoughts To sympathy with man, he was alive To all that was enjoyed where'er he went, And all that was endured ; for, in himself Happy, and quiet in his cheerfulness, He had no painful pressure from without That made him turn aside from wretchedness With coward fears. He could afford to suffer With those whom he saw suffer. Hence it came That in our best experience he was rich And in the wisdom...
Page 346 - And beauty born of murmuring sound Shall pass into her face. "And vital feelings of delight Shall rear her form to stately height, Her virgin bosom swell ; Such thoughts to Lucy I will give While she and I together live Here in this happy dell.
Page 355 - What harmonious pensive changes Wait upon her as she ranges Round and through this Pile of state, Overthrown and desolate ! Now a step or two her way Is through space of open day, Where the enamoured sunny light Brightens her that was so bright ; Now doth a delicate shadow fall, Falls upon her like a breath, From some lofty arch or wall, As she passes underneath...
Page 212 - Thou who art bearing my buckler and bow, Should the soldiers of Saul look away from the foe> Stretch me that moment in blood at thy feet! Mine be the doom which they dared not to meet. III. Farewell to others, but never we part, Heir to my royalty, son of my heart ! Bright is the diadem, boundless the sway, Or kingly the death, which awaits us to-day ! SAUL.
Page 123 - Pilate therefore said unto him, Art thou a king then? Jesus answered, Thou sayest that I am a king. To this end was I born, and for this cause came I into the world, that I should bear witness unto the truth. Every one that is of the truth heareth my voice.
Page 696 - Wherefore, we acknowledge a dutiful necessity of doing well, but the meritorious dignity of doing well we utterly renounce. We see how far we are from the perfect righteousness of the Law ; the little fruit which we have in holiness, it is, God knoweth, corrupt and unsound : we put no confidence at all in it, we challenge nothing in the world for it, we dare not call God to reckoning, as if we had him in our debtbooks : our continual suit to him is, and must be, to bear with our infirmities, and...
Page 843 - I want beside ? 2 He leads me to the place Where heavenly pasture grows, Where living waters gently pass, And full salvation flows. 3 If e'er I go astray, He doth my soul reclaim ; And guides me in His own right way, For His most holy name. 4 While He affords His aid, I cannot yield to fear ; Though I should walk through death's dark shade, My Shepherd's with me there.
Page 234 - Harry, or to the babe that's yet to be born — God forbid — and make them kind to the poor, and better folk than their father! — And now, ride e'en your ways; for these are the last words ye'll ever hear Meg Merrilies speak, and this is the last reise that I'll ever cut in the bonny woods of Ellangowan." So saying, she broke the sapling she held in her hand, and flung it into the road. Margaret of Anjou, bestowing on her triumphant foes her keen-edged malediction, could not have turned from...

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