Town Origins and Development in Early England, C.400-950 A.D.

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Greenwood Publishing Group, 1998 - History - 309 pages
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Relying heavily on primary literary sources and archaeological scholarship, this study sheds new light on the development of towns in early England from late Roman to late Anglo-Saxon times. After a discussion of the problems of urban definition and typology, Russo examines the background of Romano-British urbanism in its prime and in its late Roman transformations. He demonstrates that late Roman towns were virtually abandoned before the Anglo-Saxon invasions. The emporia--new types of Anglo-Saxon towns--are analyzed on the basis of written and archaeological evidence and are compared with continental emporia. Finally, the origin and growth of the Anglo-Saxon burgh is considered from its eighth-century Mercian beginnings to the better known cases of King Alfred and his successors.

 

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Contents

Contents
v
Preface
vii
Abbreviations
ix
1 Introduction
1
2 RomanoBritish Towns c43500 AD
39
Case Studies
65
Continuity or Rebirth? c400650 AD
99
5 The Age of AngloSaxon Emporia c600850 AD
137
6 Continental Emporia and Their English Connections c600900 AD
169
Mercia and Wessex c750950 AD
193
8 Conclusion
231
Selected Bibliography
235
Maps and Figures
259
Index
301
Copyright

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About the author (1998)

DANIEL G. RUSSO received his Ph.D. in history from the University of Connecticut.

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