Marian Anderson: A Singer's Journey

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University of Illinois Press, 2000 - Biography & Autobiography - 447 pages
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Anderson's intense privacy and devotion to her work distanced her from direct roles in the civil rights movement, but she remained a symbol of possibility throughout her career. Famously, Eleanor Roosevelt resigned from the Daughters of the American Revolution when the organization refused to let Anderson perform at Constitution Hall. Images of Anderson singing at the 1939 Easter concert, subsequently moved to the Lincoln Memorial, established her as an icon in the struggle against discrimination.
 

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Marian Anderson: a singer's journey

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Here at last is a significant book about the life and career of Marian Anderson. Born in Philadelphia in 1897, Anderson, like so many African American singers, got her start in a Baptist church choir ... Read full review

Contents

Childhood in South Philadelphia 18971915
15
The Struggle for Education 19151921
29
Touring with Billy King 19211928
50
London 1928
68
The Judson Years 19291930
83
Berlin and Scandinvia 19301931
94
Marian Fever 19321934
115
Fame in Europe 19341935
133
Postwar Years 19431952
243
One the World Stage 19521958
261
Retirement 19591993
293
Repertory
337
Discography
353
References
380
Bibliography
383
Notes
389

A Hurok Artist 19351939
159
The Concert at the Lincoln Memorial Easter Sunday 1939
181
Marriage and Career 19391943
218

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About the author (2000)

Keiler is professor of music at Brandeis University.

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