Emma (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Digireads.com Publishing, Jan 1, 2004 - Fiction
41 Reviews
"Emma" is the story of Emma Woodhouse, a young girl from a good home that does not need the financial support of a husband and is determined not to marry. Emma however is not opposed to the idea of marriage for others and is determined to play matchmaker between several of the local citizens. In spite of Emma's resolve not to marry she finds herself attracted to several men throughout the book and considers the prospect of marriage. "Emma" is the story of 19th century romance and relationships and is a timeless classic from the era. Will Emma marry or will she remain a single girl? Read this classic and discover for yourself.
  

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Review: Emma

User Review  - Goodreads

The last 90 pages were pure torture. Ending was obvious. Read full review

Review: Emma

User Review  - Mary - Goodreads

It's called a classic for a reason. If you've only seen one of the many movie versions do yourself a favor and read the book, you won't be sorry. Read full review

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Selected pages

Contents

CHAPTER XI p
127
CHAPTER XII p
132
CHAPTER XIII p
135
CHAPTER XIV p
138
CHAPTER XV p
144
CHAPTER XVI p
148
CHAPTER XVII p
153
CHAPTER XVIII p
156

CHAPTER IX p
37
CHAPTER X p
45
CHAPTER XI p
49
CHAPTER XII p
52
CHAPTER XIII p
57
CHAPTER XIV p
62
CHAPTER XV p
65
CHAPTER XVI p
70
CHAPTER XVII p
73
CHAPTER XVIII p
75
VOLUME II
80
CHAPTER II p
84
CHAPTER III p
87
CHAPTER IV p
93
CHAPTER V p
96
CHAPTER VI p
101
CHAPTER VII p
105
CHAPTER VIII p
109
CHAPTER IX p
118
CHAPTER X p
123
VOLUME III
161
CHAPTER II p
163
CHAPTER III p
169
CHAPTER IV p
172
CHAPTER V p
175
CHAPTER VI p
180
CHAPTER VII p
187
CHAPTER VIII p
193
CHAPTER IX p
197
CHAPTER X p
200
CHAPTER XI p
205
CHAPTER XII p
212
CHAPTER XIII p
216
CHAPTER XIV p
221
CHAPTER XV p
226
CHAPTER XVI p
230
CHAPTER XVII p
235
CHAPTER XVIII p
240
CHAPTER XIX p
246
Copyright

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Page 21 - I have seen a great many lists of her drawing up at various times of books that she meant to read regularly through, — and very good lists they were, very well chosen and very neatly arranged — sometimes alphabetically, and sometimes by some other rule. The list she drew up when only fourteen, — I remember thinking it did her judgment so much credit that I preserved it some time; and I dare say she may have made out a very good list now. But I have done with expecting any course of steady reading...
Page 5 - Emma Woodhouse, handsome, clever, and rich, with a comfortable home and happy disposition, seemed to unite some of the best blessings of existence; and had lived nearly twenty-one years in the world with very little to distress or vex her.
Page 15 - Mrs. Bates, let me propose your venturing on one of these eggs. An egg boiled very soft is not unwholesome.
Page 26 - Oh no! certainly not too tall; not in the least too tall. Consider, she is sitting down— which naturally presents a different— which in short gives exactly the idea— and the proportions must be preserved, you know. Proportions, fore-shortening.— Oh no! it gives one exactly the idea of such a height as Miss Smith's. Exactly so indeed!
Page 14 - He loved to have the cloth laid, because it had been the fashion of his youth, but his conviction of suppers being very unwholesome made him rather sorry to see any thing put on it; and while his hospitality would have welcomed his visitors to every thing, his care for their health made him grieve that they would eat.
Page 14 - This was all that was generally known of her history. She had no visible friends but what had been acquired at Highbury, and was now just returned from a long visit in the country to some young ladies who had been at school there with her. She was a very pretty girl, and her beauty happened to be of a sort which Emma particularly admired. She was short, plump and fair, with a fine bloom, blue eyes, light hair, regular features, and a look of great sweetness...

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About the author (2004)

Jane Austen's life is striking for the contrast between the great works she wrote in secret and the outward appearance of being quite dull and ordinary. Austen was born in the small English town of Steventon in Hampshire, and educated at home by her clergyman father. She was deeply devoted to her family. For a short time, the Austens lived in the resort city of Bath, but when her father died, they returned to Steventon, where Austen lived until her death at the age of 41. Austen was drawn to literature early, she began writing novels that satirized both the writers and the manners of the 1790's. Her sharp sense of humor and keen eye for the ridiculous in human behavior gave her works lasting appeal. She is at her best in such books as Pride and Prejudice (1813), Mansfield Park (1814), and Emma (1816), in which she examines and often ridicules the behavior of small groups of middle-class characters. Austen relies heavily on conversations among her characters to reveal their personalities, and at times her novels read almost like plays. Several of them have, in fact, been made into films. She is considered to be one of the most beloved British authors.

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