George Geith of Fen Court: A Novel

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T. O. H. P. Burnham, 1865 - 555 pages
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Page 283 - Though thou shouldest bray a fool in a mortar among wheat with a pestle, yet will not his foolishness depart from him.
Page 549 - At the moment George Geith knew, in a stupid, dull kind of way, that to him Beryl had been an earthly immortality ; that to have her again for his own, had been the one hope of his weary life, which had made the days and the hours endurable unto him. ' Oh! woe for the great waste of love which there is in this world below; to think how it is filling some hearts to bursting, whilst others are starving for the lack thereof; to think how those who may never be man and wife, those who are about to be...
Page 550 - On George Geith the blow fell with such force that he groped darkly about, trying to grasp his trouble; trying to meet some tangible foe with whom to grapple. Life without Beryl; days without sun; winter without a hope of summer; nights that could never know a dawn. My reader, have patience, have patience with the despairing grief of this strong man, who had at length met with a sorrow that crushed him. "Have patience whilst I try to tell of the end that came to his business and to his pleasure;...
Page 283 - Answer not a fool according to his folly, lest thou also be like unto him. 5 Answer a fool according to his folly, lest he be wise in his own conceit.
Page 550 - Have patience whilst I try to tell of the end that came to his business and to his pleasure; to the years he had spent in toil; to the hours in which he had tasted enjoyment! To the struggles there had come success ; to the hopes fruition; but with success and with fruition there had come likewise death. ' Everything for him was ended in existence. Living, he was as one dead. Wealth could not console him ; success could not comfort him ; for him, for this hard, fierce worker, for the man who had...
Page 548 - ... more, sharpened her voice and gave it a tone she never intended. 'Have you grown to doubt me?' he asked. 'Do you not know I would marry you to-morrow if I could? Do you think that throughout all the years to come, be they many or be they few, I could change to you?
Page 8 - ... there was little noise of life in the old churchyard. The sparrows in the trees or the footfall of some one entering or quitting the court alone disturbed the silence. The roar of Fenchurch Street on the one side, and of...
Page 370 - All down the hill his loving bride Now ran with all her force To push him in, he stepped aside, And she fell in, of course. Now splashing, dashing like a fish — "Oh, save me, Johnny Sands." "I can't, my dear, though much I wish, For you have tied my hands.
Page 559 - Ancient Spanish Ballads; Historical and Romantic, translated, with an Introduction and Notes, by JG LOCKHART, Esq. A New Edition, revised. With a Portrait of Lockhart and a Sketch of his Life. One vol. 8vo. Beautifully printed, on laid paper. Price in cloth, extra, bevelled boards, . . $1.50 " half morocco, Beckford style, . . 2.50 " full morocco antique .... 4.50 " Lockhart is only known as a poet by his Spanish Ballads.
Page 549 - Had the soul been taken out of his body, life could not have been more valueless. Take away the belief of immortality, and what has mortality left to live for. At the moment George Geith knew, in a stupid, dull kind of way, that to him Beryl had been an earthly immortality ; that to have her again for his own, had been the one hope of his weary life, which had made the days and the hours endurable unto him.

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