The Histories, Volume 2

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W. Heinemann, 1922 - Greece
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Page 524 - Rev. RG Bury. 4 Vols. SOPHOCLES. F. Storr. 2 Vols. Verse trans. STRABO : GEOGRAPHY. Horace L. Jones. 8 Vols.
Page 524 - DAPHNIS AND CHLOE. PAUSANIAS: DESCRIPTION OF GREECE. WHS Jones. 5 Vols. and Companion Vol. (Vol. I. 2nd Imp.) PHILO.
Page 73 - Therefore both writers and readers of history should not pay so much attention to the actual narrative of events, as to what precedes, what accompanies, and what follows each. For if we take from history the discussion of why, how, and wherefore each thing was done, and whether the result was what we should have reasonably expected, what is left is a clever essay but not a lesson, and while pleasing for the moment of no possible benefit for the future.
Page 523 - SILIUS ITALICUS. JD Duff. 2 Vols. (Vol. I 2nd Imp., Vol. II 3rd Imp.) STATIUS. JH Mozley. 2 Vols. SUETONIUS. JC Rolfe. 2 Vols. (Vol. I 7th Imp., Vol.
Page 315 - Timoxenus five days before the proper date of his entering office, wrote to the different cities with orders that all citizens of military age should present themselves in arms at Megalopolis. Before proceeding I think I should say a few words about Aratus owing to the singularity of his character. 8. He had in general all the qualities that go to make a perfect man of affairs. He was a powerful speaker and a clear thinker and had the faculty of keeping his own counsel. In his power of dealing suavely...
Page 137 - TWV oeiTrvrjTwv. the plain of the Po, and encamping there, waited for the enemy, being anxious to give him battle. 57. Now that I have brought my narrative and the war and the two generals into Italy, I desire, before entering upon the struggle, to say a few words on what I think proper to my method in this work. Some readers will perhaps ask themselves why, since most of what I have said relates to Africa and Spain, I have not said a word more about the mouth of the Mediterranean at the Pillars...
Page 369 - Now had there been any connexion at the outset between Hannibal's enterprise and the affairs of Greece it is evident that I should have included the latter in the previous Book, and, following the chronology, placed my narrative of them side by side in alternate sections with that of the affairs of Spain.
Page 59 - Tarseum. If the Carthaginians capture any city in Latium not subject to Rome, they shall keep the valuables and the men, but give up the city. If any Carthaginians take captive any of a people with whom the Romans have a treaty of peace, but who are not subject to Rome, they shall not bring them into Roman harbours, but if one be brought in and a Roman lay hold of him,
Page 73 - ... we take from history the discussion of why, how and wherefore each thing was done and whether the result was what we should reasonably have expected, what is left is a clever essay but not a lesson, and while pleasing for the moment of no possible benefit for the future.2'2 POLYBIUS NOTES TO CHAPTER 1 1. See Morton G. White, "Toward an Analytical Interpretation of History,
Page 523 - Impression. ) PLAUTUS. Trans, by Paul Nixon. 5 Vols. Vols. I and II. PLINY : LETTERS. Melmoth's Translation revised by WML Hutchinson. 2 Vols. PROPERTIUS. Trans, by HE Butler.