Revolution at the Table: The Transformation of the American Diet

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University of California Press, 2003 - History - 275 pages
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In this wide-ranging and entertaining study Harvey Levenstein tells of how from 1880 to 1930, as America's industries and cities swelled, various reformers tried to use the new nutritional science to make Americans eat more economically and healthily, sometimes with bizarre results.

 

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Contents

The BritishAmerican Culinary Heritage
3
How the Other Half Ate
23
The Rise of the Giant Food Processors
30
The New England Kitchen and the Failure to Reform WorkingClass Eating Habits
44
The Servant Problem and MiddleClass Cookery
60
The New Nutritionists Assault the Middle Classes
72
Scientists Pseudoscientists and Faddists
86
New Reformers and New Immigrants
98
The Controversy Over Artificial Feeding of Infants
121
Food Will Win the War
137
The Newer Nutrition 19151930
147
A Revolution of Declining Expectations
161
Workers and Farmers During the Prosperity Decade
173
The Old Restaurant Order Changeth
183
Notes
213
Index
261

The Great Malnutrition Scare 19071921
109

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Page 253 - Rice, Influence of Education on the Food Habits of Some New York City Families.

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About the author (2003)

Harvey Levenstein is Professor Emeritus of History at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario. Among his books are Paradox of Plenty: A Social History of Eating in Modern America, Revised Edition (California, 2003), Seductive Journey: American Tourists in France from the Jefferson to the Jazz Age (1998), and Communism, Anticommunism and the CIO (1981).

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