The digressions of V.: written for his own fun and that of his friends

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Houghton Mifflin Co., 1910 - Art - 521 pages
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Page 311 - s thousands o' my mind. [The first recruiting sergeant on record I conceive to have been that individual who is mentioned in the Book of Job as going to and fro in the earth , and walking up and down in it.
Page 139 - I studied by myself, and sometimes wish I hadn't, for my pictures always have to me a home-made air which I don't like.
Page 145 - there's nothing either good or bad but thinking makes it so" — and then I thought things were very good. And yet there was not lacking that rich, romantic sadness of youth. I had it very badly and enjoyed it immensely: otherwise how account for my preparations for dying young, preparations for which event were amply provided for in numberless subjects I then conceived but, with few exceptions, never executed — the alchemist dying just as he had made his grand discovery; the young hermit praying...
Page 236 - Her meekly bowed head and a look of patient endurance and resignation touched my heart and we became friends. She had been a slave down South, and had at that time a son, a fine tall fellow, she said, fighting in the Union Army. I finally persuaded her to sit to me and made a drawing of her head and also had her photograph taken. Having been elected associate of the National Academy, according to custom I had to send in a painting to add to the permanent collection, so I sent in this study of her...
Page 263 - Now, when you saw Emerson, you saw Alcott; but when you saw Alcott you did not necessarily see Emerson. Be that as it may, Emerson fell to my lot. I will not describe him — he was all that is most sweet and gracious; so was I.
Page 164 - Following up the stream, you finally reached the spot where it passes under a bridge at the foot of the long ascent which leads to Fiesole. It was here I painted two of my best studies, and also a little picture I always thought highly of. These things show that originally I was a landscape painter and that now I am only the lively remains of one. The little picture was really a sketch I made on a dark stormy day, of Fiesole with the road and cypresses coming down from it, into the foreground of...
Page 69 - Through the Rye If a body meet a body comin' through the Rye If a body kiss a body need a body cry? Every lassie has her laddie, Nane, they say, Hae I; Yet a' the lads they smile on me, when comin' thru the Rye. If a body meet a body comin' frae the town If a body greet a body need a body frown?
Page 236 - ... Formerly a Slave" The painting is listed in the catalogue of the 1865 exhibition of the National Academy of Design as "Jane Jackson, formerly a Slave— Drawing in oil-color" by Elihu Vedder. In his memoirs Vedder relates how he came to paint it (Digressions, p. 236) : "At the time I had my studio . . . on Broadway; I used to pass frequently a near corner, where an old negro woman sold peanuts. Her meekly bowed head and a look of patient endurance and resignation touched my heart. . . . She had...
Page 239 - National Academy, according to custom I had to send in a painting to add to the permanent collection, so I sent in this study of her head and called it simply by her name— which was Jane Jackson. Time went on and I found myself in a mood. As I always try to embody my moods in some picture, this mood found its resting-place in the picture of "The Cumean Sibyl.
Page 264 - ... nature seen through other eyes, and a literary man in Patagonia without books to consult would be at a great disadvantage. Here he has all that is essential in the way of books ; but to the artist, whose books are pictures, this land is Patagonia.

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