Our Mathematical Universe: My Quest for the Ultimate Nature of Reality

Front Cover
Penguin Books Limited, Jan 7, 2014 - Science - 432 pages
2 Reviews

Max Tegmark leads us on an astonishing journey through past, present, and future, and through the physics, astronomy, and mathematics that are the foundation of his work, most particularly his hypothesis that our physical reality is a mathematical structure and his theory of the ultimate multiverse. In a dazzling combination of both popular and groundbreaking science, he not only helps us grasp his often mind-boggling theories, but he also shares with us some of the often surprising triumphs and disappointments that have shaped his life as a scientist. Fascinating from first to last - here is a book for the full science-reading spectrum.

Max Tegmark is author or co-author of more than 200 technical papers, twelve of which have been cited more than 500 times. He has featured in dozens of science documentaries, and his work with the SDSS collaboration on galaxy clustering shared the first prize in Science magazine's "Breakthrough of the Year: 2003". He holds a Ph.D from the University of California, Berkeley, and is a physics professor at MIT.

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - TheDivineOomba - LibraryThing

This one is odd for me to review. On one had - the science is wonderful. On the other hand, the author is rather arrogant. First, the good. Its high end stuff. The author knows his stuff, and the ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - MarkBeronte - LibraryThing

Max Tegmark leads us on an astonishing journey through past, present and future, and through the physics, astronomy and mathematics that are the foundation of his work, most particularly his ... Read full review

Other editions - View all

About the author (2014)

Max Tegmark is author or co-author of more than 200 technical papers, twelve of which have been cited more than 500 times. He has featured in dozens of science documentaries, and his work with the SDSS collaboration on galaxy clustering shared the first prize in Science magazine's "Breakthrough of the Year: 2003". He holds a Ph.D from the University of California, Berkeley, and is a physics professor at MIT.

Bibliographic information