An Elementary Arithmetic on the Inductive Plan: Including Oral and Written Exercises

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American Book Company, 1882 - Arithmetic - 205 pages
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Page 154 - LIQUID MEASURE 4 gills (gi.) = 1 pint (pt.) 2 pints — 1 quart (qt...
Page 86 - Cancel the common factors from both the dividend and divisor. II. Then divide the product of the remaining factors of the dividend by the product of the remaining factors of the divisor, and the result will be the quotient.
Page 67 - The Dividend is the number to be divided. The Divisor is the number by which we divide.
Page 139 - When a decimal number is to be divided by 10, 100, 1000, &c., remove the decimal point as many places to the left as there are ciphers in the divisor, and if there be not figures enough in the number, prefix ciphers.
Page 137 - To multiply a decimal by 10, 100, 1000, &c., remove the decimal point as many places to the right as there are ciphers in the multiplier ; and if there be not places enough in the number, annex ciphers.
Page 76 - Write the divisor at the left of the dividend with a curved line between them. Find how many times the...
Page 154 - CUBIC MEASURE 1728 cubic inches (cu. in.) = 1 cubic foot (cu. ft.) 27 cubic feet = 1 cubic yard (cu. yd.) 128 cubic feet = 1 cord (cd...
Page 132 - RULE. — Annex ciphers to the numerator and divide by the denominator. Point off as many decimal places in the quotient as there are ciphers annexed.
Page 136 - Multiply as in whole numbers, and from the right hand of the product point off as many figures for decimals as there are decimal places in both factors.
Page 138 - 03, the same as before. IT 73. The foregoing examples and remarks are sufficient to establish the following RULE. In the division of decimal fractions, divide as in whole numbers, and from the right hand of the quotient point off as many figures for decimals, as the decimal figures in the dividend exceed those in the divisor, and if there are not so many figures in the quotient, supply the deficiency by prefixing ciphers.

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