The Annual Register of World Events: A Review of the Year, Volume 65

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Edmund Burke
Longmans, Green, 1824 - History
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Page 194 - ... is, not to interfere in the internal concerns of any of its powers; to consider the government de facto as the legitimate government for us; to cultivate friendly relations with it, and to preserve those relations by a frank, firm, and manly policy, meeting in all instances the just claims of every power, submitting to injuries from none.
Page 193 - Our policy in regard to Europe, which was adopted at an early stage of the wars which have so long agitated that quarter of the globe, nevertheless remains the same, which is not to interfere in the internal concerns of any of its powers...
Page 187 - In the discussions to which this interest has given rise and in the arrangements by which they may terminate the occasion has been judged proper for asserting, as a principle in which the rights and interests of the United States are involved, that the American continents, by the free and independent condition which they have assumed and maintain, are henceforth not to be considered as subjects for future colonization by any European powers...
Page 151 - You well know, gentlemen, how soon one of those stupendous masses, now reposing on their shadows in perfect stillness, — how soon, upon any call of patriotism, or of necessity, it would assume the likeness of an animated thing, instinct with life and motion — how soon it would ruffle, as it were, its swelling plumage — how quickly it would put forth all its beauty and its bravery, collect its scattered elements of strength, and awaken its dormant thunder.
Page 50 - As smoke is driven away, so drive them away: as wax melteth before the fire, so let the wicked perish at the presence of God.
Page 193 - The citizens of the United States cherish sentiments the most friendly in favor of the liberty and happiness of their fellowmen on that side of the Atlantic. In the wars of the European powers in matters relating to themselves we have never taken any part, nor does it comport with our policy so to do.
Page 91 - ... shall be guilty of felony ; and, being convicted thereof, shall be liable, at the discretion of the Court, to be transported beyond the seas for life, *or for any term not less than seven years, or to be imprisoned for any term not exceeding four years : and, if a male, to be once, twice, or thrice publicly or privately whipped (if the Court shall so think fit,) in addition to such imprisonment...
Page 237 - An Act to defray the Charge of the Pay, Clothing, and contingent and other Expenses of the Disembodied Militia in Great Britain and Ireland ; to grant Allowances in certain Cases to Subaltern Officers, Adjutants, Paymasters, Quartermasters, Surgeons, Assistant Surgeons, Surgeons Mates, and Serjeant Majors of the Militia ; and to authorize the Employment of the Non-commissioned Officers.
Page 192 - It was stated at the commencement of the last session that a great effort was then making in Spain and Portugal to improve the condition of the people of those countries, and that it appeared to be conducted with extraordinary moderation. It need scarcely be remarked that the result has been so far very different from what was then anticipated. Of events in that quarter of the Globe, with which we have so much intercourse and from which we derive our origin, we have always been anxious and interested...
Page 241 - In the war between those new governments and Spain, we declared our neutrality at the time of their recognition; and to this we have adhered, and shall continue to adhere, provided no change shall occur which, in the judgment of the competent authorities of this government, shall make a corresponding change on the part of the United States indispensable to their security.

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