The Permanent Campaign and Its Future

Front Cover
American Enterprise Institute, Jan 1, 2000 - Political Science - 247 pages
2 Reviews
Annotation We live in the age of the "permanent campaign", when the line between campaigning and governing has blurred, when pollsters are consulted on nearly every matter of policy, and when the old congressional customs of comity have given way to roll call votes designed solely to frame campaign commercials. The Permanent Campaign and Its Future in the first comprehensive scholarly examination of this new political condition -- its origin and causes, its impact on politics and policy, its glorification of the pollster, and its consequences for institutions such as the Congress and the courts and for mechanisms such as the traditional appointments process. The eminent political scientists who contribute to the book weigh the benefits and the costs of this state of permanent campaign and describe the kind of political system that is likely to emerge within it.
  

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Review: The Permanent Campaign and Its Future

User Review  - Anthony Faber - Goodreads

Essays written in 2000 on the various ramifications of the fact that congresspeople are constantly campaigning and raising money. Read full review

Review: The Permanent Campaign and Its Future

User Review  - Goodreads

Essays written in 2000 on the various ramifications of the fact that congresspeople are constantly campaigning and raising money. Read full review

Contents

The Press and the Permanent Campaign
38
Polling to Campaign and to Govern
54
The Congressional Money Chase
75
Surviving and Thriving
108
Congress in the Era of the Permanent Campaign
134
Campaigns without Elections
162
Lessons from the Clinton
185
The Permanent Campaign and the Future
219
Index
235
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Norman J. Ornstein is a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research. He also serves as an election analyst for CBS News and writes a weekly column, "Congress Inside Out," for Roll Call.

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