Chambers's Miscellany of Instructive & Entertaining Tracts, Volumes 7-8

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William Chambers, Robert Chambers
Lippincott, 1870
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Page 36 - I consider it an indispensable duty to close this last act of my official life by commending the interests of our dearest country to the protection of Almighty God, and those who have the superintendence of them to his holy keeping. Having now finished the work assigned me, I retire from the great theatre of action, and bidding an affectionate farewell to this august body, under whose orders I have so long acted, I here offer my commission, and take my leave of all the employments of public life.
Page 92 - I looked to heaven, and tried to pray; But or ever a prayer had gusht, A wicked whisper came, and made My heart as dry as dust. I closed my lids, and kept them close, And the balls like pulses beat; For the sky and the sea, and the sea and the sky, Lay like a load on my weary eye, And the dead were at my feet.
Page 92 - He holds him with his glittering eye — The wedding-guest stood still, And listens like a three-years' child : The Mariner hath his will. The wedding-guest sat on a stone : He cannot choose but hear ; And thus spake on that ancient man, The bright-eyed Mariner : ' The ship was cheered, the harbour cleared, Merrily did we drop Below the kirk, below the hill, Below the lighthouse top. Higher and higher every day, Till over the mast at noon ' — The wedding-guest here beat his breast, For he heard...
Page 92 - She listened with a flitting blush, With downcast eyes and modest grace ; For well she knew I could not choose But gaze upon her face. I told her of the knight that wore Upon his shield a burning brand ; And that for ten long years he wooed The lady of the land.
Page 92 - I saw a third — I heard his voice: It is the Hermit good! He singeth loud his godly hymns That he makes in the wood. He'll shrieve my soul, he'll wash away The Albatross's blood.
Page 92 - All fixed on me their stony eyes, That in the Moon did glitter. The pang, the curse, with which they died, Had never passed away: I could not draw my eyes from theirs, Nor turn them up to pray.
Page 92 - The upper air burst into life! And a hundred fire-flags sheen, To and fro they were hurried about! And to and fro, and in and out, The wan stars danced between.
Page 92 - On every corse there stood. This seraph-band, each waved his hand: It was a heavenly sight! They stood as signals to the land, Each one a lovely light; 441 This seraph-band, each waved his hand, No voice did they impart — No voice; but oh!
Page 92 - There passed a weary time. Each throat Was parched, and glazed each eye. A weary time ! a weary time ! How glazed each weary eye ! When looking westward I beheld A something in the sky. At first it seemed a little speck, And then it seemed a mist ; It moved, and moved, and took at last A certain shape, I wist.
Page 92 - Her locks were yellow as gold: Her skin was as white as leprosy, The Night-mare LIFE-IN-DEATH was she, Who thicks man's blood with cold. The naked hulk alongside came, And the twain were casting dice; 'The game is done! I've won! I've won!

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