Voltaire's Candide or The optimist [in tr.] and Rasselas prince of Abyssinia by S. Johnson

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1884
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Contents

I
11
II
13
III
16
IV
19
V
22
VI
25
VII
27
VIII
29
LI
175
LII
178
LIII
180
LIV
182
LV
185
LVI
186
LVII
190
LVIII
191

IX
32
X
34
XI
36
XII
40
XIII
44
XIV
47
XV
51
XVI
53
XVII
57
XVIII
62
XIX
68
XX
74
XXI
77
XXII
79
XXIII
91
XXIV
92
XXV
97
XXVI
103
XXVII
107
XXVIII
111
XXIX
114
XXX
115
XXXI
121
XXXII
124
XXXIII
127
XXXIV
129
XXXV
131
XXXVI
132
XXXVII
135
XXXVIII
137
XXXIX
140
XL
143
XLI
145
XLII
146
XLIII
152
XLIV
155
XLV
158
XLVI
160
XLVII
162
XLVIII
165
XLIX
168
L
170
LIX
194
LX
197
LXI
200
LXII
203
LXIII
207
LXIV
209
LXV
210
LXVI
212
LXVII
215
LXVIII
216
LXIX
218
LXX
220
LXXI
221
LXXII
223
LXXIII
226
LXXIV
227
LXXV
228
LXXVI
230
LXXVII
232
LXXVIII
234
LXXIX
237
LXXX
240
LXXXI
243
LXXXII
245
LXXXIII
246
LXXXIV
247
LXXXV
250
LXXXVI
253
LXXXVII
254
LXXXVIII
255
LXXXIX
259
XC
264
XCI
266
XCII
267
XCIII
268
XCIV
270
XCV
272
XCVI
275
XCVII
280
XCVIII
283
XCIX
286

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 199 - The business of a poet," said Imlac, "is to examine, not the individual, but the species; to remark general properties, and large appearances; he does not number the streaks of the tulip, or describe the different shades in the verdure of the forest.
Page 199 - He must write as the interpreter of nature, and the legislator of mankind, and consider himself as presiding over the thoughts and manners of future generations, as a being superior to time and place.
Page 218 - Consider that external things are naturally variable, but truth and reason are always the same." "What comfort," said the mourner, "can truth and reason afford me? Of what effect are they now, but to tell me that my daughter will not be restored?
Page 189 - I should with great alacrity teach them all to fly. But •what would be the security of the good, if the bad could at pleasure invade them from the sky ? Against an army sailing through the clouds, neither walls, nor mountains, nor seas, could afford any security. A flight of northern savages might hover in the wind, and light at once with irresistible violence upon the capital of a fruitful region that was rolling under them.
Page 252 - ... is hourly lost and something acquired. To lose much at once is inconvenient to either, but while the vital powers remain uninjured, nature will find the means of reparation. Distance has the same effect on the mind as on the eye, and while we glide along the stream of time, whatever we leave behind us is always lessening and that which we approach increasing in magnitude. Do not suffer life to stagnate; it will grow muddy for want of motion. Commit yourself again to the current of the world;...
Page 188 - So, replied the mechanist, fishes have the water, in which yet beasts can swim by nature, and men by art. He that can swim needs not despair to fly : to swim is to fly in a grosser fluid, and to fly is to swim in a subtler. We are only to proportion our power of resistance to the different density of matter through which we are to pass.
Page 244 - I will not undertake to maintain, against the concurrent and unvaried testimony of all ages, and of all nations. There is no people, rude or learned, among whom apparitions of the dead are not related and believed. This opinion, which prevails, as far as human nature is diffused, could become universal only by its truth...
Page 200 - IMI.AC now felt the enthusiastic fit, and was proceeding to aggrandize his own profession, when the Prince cried out: " Enough ! thou hast convinced me that no human being can ever be a poet.
Page 186 - ... now known the blessing of hope, resolved never to despair. In these fruitless searches he spent ten months. The time however passed cheerfully away; in the morning he rose with new hope ; in the evening applauded his own diligence ; and in the night slept sound after his fatigue. He met a thousand amusements, which beguiled his labour and diversified his thoughts. He discerned the various instincts of animals and properties of plants, and found the place replete with wonders...
Page 175 - YE who listen with credulity to the whispers of fancy, and pursue with eagerness the phantoms of hope ; who expect that age will perform the promises of youth, and that the deficiencies of the present day will be supplied by the morrow; attend to the history of Rasselas, Prince of Abissinia.

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