The National Military Park, Chickamauga -- Chattanooga: An Historical Guide ...

Front Cover
Robert Clarke Company, 1895 - Chattanooga (Tenn.), Battle of, 1863 - 307 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 234 - You have given him dominion over the works of your hands; you have put all things under his feet, all sheep and oxen, and also the beasts of the field, the birds of the air, and the fish of the sea, whatever passes along the paths of the sea.
Page 266 - ... destroy, cut, hack, bark, break down, or otherwise injure any tree, bush, or shrubbery that may be growing upon said park, or shall cut down or fell or remove any timber, battle relic?
Page 109 - ... be given as might be desirable. However, the general plan, you understand, is for Sherman, with the force brought with him, strengthened by a division from your command, to effect a crossing of the Tennessee river just below the mouth of...
Page 293 - The suggestion of a movement by our right, immediately after the battle, to the north of the Tennessee, and thence upon Nashville, requires notice only because it will find a place on the files of the department. Such a movement was utterly impossible for want of transportation. Nearly half our army consisted of reinforcements just before the battle, without a wagon or an artillery horse, and nearly, if not quite, a third of the artillery horses on the field had been lost. The railroad bridges, too,...
Page 153 - Lucien Greathouse 97th Indiana, Col. Robert F. Catterson 99th Indiana, Col. Alexander Fowler 53d Ohio, Col. Wells S. Jones 70th Ohio, Maj. William B. Brown Artillery Capt. Henry Richardson 1st Illinois Light, Battery F, Capt. John T. Cheney 1st Illinois Light, Battery I, Lieut. Josiah H. Burton 1st Missouri Light, Battery D, Lieut. Byron M. Callender SEVENTEENTH ARMY CORPS SECOND DIVISION Brig.
Page 293 - It also left open to the enemy, at a distance of only ten miles, our battle field, with thousands of our wounded and his own, and all the trophies and supplies we had won. All this was to be risked and given up for what ? To gain the enemy's rear and cut him off from his depot of supplies by the route over the mountains, when the very movement abandoned to his unmolested use the better and more practicable route, of half the length, on the south side of the river. It is hardly necessary to say, the...
Page 111 - ... right and centre, and a movable column of one division in readiness to move wherever ordered. This division should show itself as threateningly as possible on the most practicable line for making an attack up the valley. Your effort...
Page 263 - ... trees or underbrush under such regulations as the Secretary may prescribe, and that they will assist in caring for and protecting all tablets, monuments, or such other artificial works as may from time to time be erected by proper authority. SEC.
Page 262 - An act to authorize the condemnation of land for sites of public buildings, and for other purposes...
Page 293 - Nearly half our army consisted of reinforcements just before the battle, without a wagon or an artillery horse, and nearly, if not quite, a third of the artillery horses on the field had been lost. The railroad bridges, too, had been destroyed to a point south of Ringgold, and on all the road from Cleveland to Knoxville. To these insurmountable difficulties were added the entire absence of means to cross the river, except by fording at a few precarious points too deep for artillery, and the wellknown...

Bibliographic information