Riding and Driving for Women

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C. Scribner's sons, 1912 - Driving of horse-drawn vehicles - 295 pages
 

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Page 2 - I think I could turn and live with animals, they are so placid and self-contain'd, I stand and look at them long and long. They do not sweat and whine about their condition, They do not lie awake in the dark and weep for their sins They do not make me sick discussing their duty to God, Not one is dissatisfied, not one is demented with the mania of owning things...
Page 2 - They do not sweat and whine about their condition, They do not lie awake in the dark and weep for their sins, They do not make me sick discussing their duty to God, L2:47 PM Page 102 JEFFREY A.
Page 2 - I stand and look at them long and long. They do not sweat and whine about their condition, They do not lie awake in the dark and weep for their sins They do not make me sick discussing their duty to God, Not one is dissatisfied, not one is demented with the mania of owning things, Not one kneels to another, nor to his kind that lived thousands of years ago, Not one is respectable or unhappy over the whole earth.
Page 3 - There is something about the outside of a horse that is good for the inside of a man.
Page 221 - When the thong is caught, it is wound around the stick in opposite directions. The lower end should be unwound with the right hand, the whip being held between the thumb and forefinger of the left hand. The end of the thong should be rewound in the same direction as the upper part and held in place by the right hand. The loop should be about two feet and a half long and caught on the quill part of the stick.
Page vii - ... interest in the subject of water-storage in the West, and a general demand for the facts regarding the works which have been built and those which are projected. This has encouraged the author to republish the paper in another form, revising and adding to it as the material has become available. The work does not pretend to be an exhaustive treatise on the subject of dam-construction in western America, nor does it assume to cover the field by an account of all the important dams which have been...
Page vii - ... that, with most of us, a knowledge, at the start, of the general fundamental principles which are the basis of form in riding and driving, is essential. It was my good fortune to have my mother, Mrs. Emily S. Beach, lay the foundation for me and, similarly, these Chapters may aid some of my readers. "Nothing in this book is hearsay. That which takes but a moment to tell has taken me years to learn; learned as a pupil; learned as a teacher; learned by observation; learned by exhibition; by many...
Page 228 - Place the right hand over the off reins and be ready to grasp the off wheel rein from the inside with the little and second fingers, should the off wheeler fail to follow the off leader in making the turn. At the same time place the middle finger of the right hand between the near wheel and the near lead rein with the forefinger over the latter, and 228 a H V.
Page 231 - In going downhill, take up your leaders so that the lead bars hang slack, and then shorten all four reins. "If your reins become misplaced, keep your team going, unless approaching or on a sharp decline. Under the latter conditions, have the servants run to the horses' heads and bring them to a stop as quickly as possible.
Page 224 - Now raise the hand and adjust the reins, with the thumb and forefinger of the right hand, so that the buckles on the wheel reins hang evenly. "Pass the lead reins into the left hand, the near rein over the index finger and the off lead rein under the index finger and on top of the near wheel rein. "When taking up the reins, draw each in turn gently through the terrets, tight enough merely to 'feel' the bit without causing the horse to flex his neck or make any backward movement.

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