Vanity Fair: A Novel Without a Hero

Front Cover
Penguin, 2003 - Fiction - 866 pages
No one is better equipped in the struggle for wealth and worldly success than the alluring and ruthless Becky Sharp, who defies her impoverished background to clamber up the class ladder. Her sentimental companion Amelia, however, longs only for caddish soldier George. As the two heroines make their way through the tawdry glamour of regency society, battles - military and domestic - are fought, fortunes made and lost. The one steadfast and honourable figure in this corrupt world is Dobbin, devoted to Amelia, bringing pathos and depth to Thackeray's gloriously satirical epic of love and social adventure.
This edition follows the text of Thackeray's revised edition of 1853, John Carey's introduction identifies Vanity Fair as a landmark in the development of European Realism, and as a reflection of Thackeray's passionate love for another man's wife.
 

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Review: Vanity Fair

User Review  - James - Goodreads

Two girls and two very different personalities and temperaments, Amelia Sedley and Becky Sharp, form the center of this lengthy story "without a hero". By the end I was almost convinced that all is ... Read full review

Contents

VI
1
VII
3
VIII
11
X
21
XI
29
XII
43
XIV
55
XV
69
LIX
414
LX
424
LXI
440
LXII
456
LXIII
466
LXIV
476
LXVI
489
LXVIII
498

XVI
78
XVIII
88
XX
96
XXI
103
XXII
119
XXIV
128
XXV
141
XXVI
161
XXVIII
171
XXIX
181
XXXI
190
XXXII
204
XXXIII
216
XXXIV
227
XXXV
237
XXXVII
247
XXXIX
254
XLI
269
XLIII
290
XLIV
299
XLVI
306
XLVII
316
XLIX
330
LI
341
LIII
354
LV
372
LVI
384
LVIII
402
LXIX
508
LXX
520
LXXI
530
LXXIII
539
LXXIV
549
LXXVI
562
LXXVII
571
LXXVIII
581
LXXX
601
LXXXII
612
LXXXIII
622
LXXXIV
632
LXXXVI
649
LXXXVII
662
LXXXIX
671
XC
684
XCI
696
XCIII
703
XCV
718
XCVII
730
XCVIII
743
XCIX
761
CI
770
CII
787
CIII
807
CIV
859
CV
862
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About the author (2003)

William Makepeace Thackeray (1811-1863) was born and educated to be a gentleman but gambled away much of his fortune while at Cambridge. He trained as a lawyer before turning to journalism. He was a regular contributor to periodicals and magazines and Vanity Fair was serialised in Punch in 1847-8.John Carey is Professor of English at Oxford University. He has written on Dickens and Thackeray.

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