The Future of Us All: Race and Neighborhood Politics in New York City

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Cornell University Press, Feb 1, 2000 - Social Science - 400 pages
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Before the next century is out, Americans of African, Asian, and Latin American ancestry will outnumber those of European origin. In the Elmhurst-Corona neighborhood of Queens, New York City, the transition occurred during the 1970s, and the area's two-decade experience of multiracial diversity offers us an early look at the future of urban America. The result of more than a dozen years' work, this remarkable book immerses us in Elmhurst-Corona's social and political life from the 1960s through the 1990s.

First settled in 1652, Elmhurst-Corona by 1960 housed a mix of Germans, Irish, Italians, and other "white ethnics." In 1990 this population made up less than a fifth of its residents; Latin American and Asian immigrants and African Americans comprised the majority. The Future of Us All focuses on the combined impact of racial change, immigrant settlement, governmental decentralization, and assaults on local quality of life which stemmed from the city's 1975 fiscal crisis and the policies of its last three mayors. The book examines the ways in which residents—in everyday interactions, block and tenant associations, houses of worship, small business coalitions, civic rituals, incidents of ethnic and racial hostility, and political struggles against overdevelopment, for more schools, and for youth programs—have forged and tested alliances across lines of race, ethnicity, and language.

From the telling local details of daily life to the larger economic and regional frameworks, this account of a neighborhood's transformation illuminates the issues that American communities will be grappling with in the coming decades.

 

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Contents

ElmhurstCorona 16521960
19
The Social Order of New York City
28
City and Neighborhood Remade 19601980
39
Racial Change and Decentralization
41
The Impact of the New Immigration
61
Fiscal Crisis and LandUse Struggles
83
Plates
103
City and Neighborhood at Odds 19801996
117
The Transformation of Neighborhood Politics
213
The New Multicultural Geography of ElmhurstCorona
215
Solidarity and Conflict among White Americans
229
Continuities in Civic Politics
256
Innovations in Civic Politics
280
The Politics of Place
300
Bonds of Interracial Cooperation
332
The Future of Us All
367

New Yorks Three Economies
119
Mayoral Ideologies
141
Mayoral Practice
165
Assaults on the Quality of Life
185
Notes
395
References
427
Index
451
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About the author (2000)

Roger Sanjek is a J. I. Staley Prize winner, a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellow, and the author of The Future of Us All: Race and Neighborhood Politics in New York City (published by Cornell University Press), Gray Panthers, and Ethnography in Today's World:Color Full Before Color Blind; the editor of Fieldnotes: The Makings of Anthropology (published by Cornell) and the coeditor (with Steven Gregory) of Race , and the series editor of The Anthropology of Contemporary Issues, published by Cornell.

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