The Borrowers

Front Cover
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 1953 - Juvenile Fiction - 180 pages
38 Reviews
Beneath the kitchen floor is the world of the Borrowers -- Pod and Homily Clock and their daughter, Arrietty. In their tiny home, matchboxes double as roomy dressers and postage stamps hang on the walls like paintings. Whatever the Clocks need they simply "borrow" from the "human beans" who live above them. It's a comfortable life, but boring if you're a kid. Only Pod is allowed to venture into the house above, because the danger of being seen by a human is too great. Borrowers who are seen by humans are never seen again. Yet Arrietty won't listen. There is a human boy up there, and Arrietty is desperate for a friend.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - wealhtheowwylfing - LibraryThing

Tiny people live in your house! A tiny little girl and her parents live out their daily lives under the baseboards of an old house. They furnish their home with items "borrowed" from the larger home ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - AliceaP - LibraryThing

Have you ever wondered where that eraser you swear you left on the kitchen table disappeared to? Do you always seem to be replacing safety pins and you have no idea where they all go? You're not ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
13
Section 3
29
Section 4
35
Section 5
55
Section 6
64
Section 7
65
Section 8
71
Section 14
114
Section 15
120
Section 16
130
Section 17
132
Section 18
133
Section 19
138
Section 20
146
Section 21
157

Section 9
80
Section 10
90
Section 11
92
Section 12
97
Section 13
105
Section 22
170
Section 23
172
Section 24
179
Section 25
189
Copyright

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About the author (1953)

MARY NORTON (1903-1992) lived in England, where she was an actress, playwright, and award-winning author. As a child she created a make-believe world in which tiny people inhabited the hedgerows, living their lives out of the sight of humans. It's from this private fantasy that her most well-known books, those about the Borrowers, came about.

LEONARD S. MARCUS is a well respected critic and historian of children's literature. His many books include Dear Genius: The Letters of Ursula Nordstrom and Margaret Wise Brown: Awakened by the Moon. He lives in New York.

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