Siddhartha

Front Cover
Peter Owen Publishers, Sep 28, 2017 - Buddhism - 176 pages

Beautiful cased edition of this classic novel.

Dissatisfied with the traditional Vedic way of life, Siddhartha, the handsome son of a Brahmin, leaves his family and his friend, Govinda, in search of a higher state of being. Having experienced the myriad forms of existence, from the wealthy and luxurious, to the pleasures of sensual and paternal love, Siddhartha finally settles down beside a river where a humble ferryman teaches him his most valuable lesson yet.

Hermann Hesse's short, elegant novel, echoing the life of the Buddha, has been cherished by readers for decades as an unforgettable spiritual primer.

'A subtle distillation of wisdom, stylistic grace and symmetry of form.' --Sunday Times

'A writer of genius.' --The Times

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - technodiabla - LibraryThing

I found this little tome to be packed with messages I'll likely ponder for some time. This quick easy read (often assigned in high school) has layers of meaning that warrant revisiting later in life ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - eldang - LibraryThing

I first read this book half a lifetime ago, and loved it. Siddharta's searching spoke to 16-year-old me, and the simplicity of the prose struck me as beautiful and appropriate. So re-reading it was ... Read full review

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About the author (2017)

Hermann Hesse (July 2, 1877 -- August 9, 1962) was a German poet, novelist, essayist and painter. His best-known works included Steppenwolf, Siddhartha, and The Glass Bead Game, each of which explores an individual's search for authenticity, self-knowledge and spirituality. In 1946, he received the Nobel Prize in Literature. Hess publicly announced his views on the savagery of World War I, and was considered a traitor. He moved to Switzerland where he eventually became a naturalized citizen. He warned of the advent of World War II, predicting that cultureless efficiency would destroy the modern world. His theme was usually the conflict between the elements of a person's dual nature and the problem of spiritual loneliness. His first novel, Peter Camenzind, was published in 1904. His masterpiece, Death and the Lover (1930), contrasts a scholarly abbot and his beloved pupil, who leaves the monastery for the adventurous world. Steppenwolf (1927), a European bestseller, was published when defeated Germany had begun to plan for another war. It is the story of Haller, who recognizes in himself the blend of the human and wolfish traits of the completely sterile scholarly project. During the 1960s Hesse became a favorite writer of the counter culture, especially in the United States, though his critical reputation has never equaled his popularity. Hermann Hesse died in 1962.

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