Profit Over People: Neoliberalism and Global Order

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Seven Stories Press, 1999 - History - 175 pages
66 Reviews
Why is the Atlantic slowly filling with crude petroleum, threatening a millions-of-years-old ecological balance? Why did traders at prominent banks take high-risk gambles with the money entrusted to them by hundreds of thousands of clients around the world, expanding and leveraging their investments to the point that failure led to a global financial crisis that left millions of people jobless and hundreds of cities economically devastated? Why would the world's most powerful military spend ten years fighting an enemy that presents no direct threat to secure resources for corporations?
The culprit in all cases is neoliberal ideology—the belief in the supremacy of "free" markets to drive and govern human affairs. And in the years since the initial publication of Noam Chomsky's Profit Over People: Neoliberalism and Global Order, the bitter vines of neoliberalism have only twisted themselves further into the world economy, obliterating the public’s voice in public affairs and substituting the bottom line in place of people’s basic obligation to care for one another as ends in themselves. In Profit Over People, Chomsky reveals the roots of the present crisis, tracing the history of neoliberalism through an incisive analysis of free trade agreements of the 1990s, the World Trade Organization, and the International Monetary Fund—and describes the movements of resistance to the increasing interference by the private sector in global affairs.
In the years since the initial publication of Profit Over People, the stakes have only risen. Now more than ever, Profit Over People is one of the key texts explaining how the crisis facing us operates—and how, through Chomsky’s analysis of resistance, we may find an escape from the closing net.
 

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Review: Profit Over People: Neoliberalism and Global Order

User Review  - Cyrus Carter - Goodreads

A first-rate analysis of our current situation. A must-read for anyone studyşing economics or just curious about today's economic plight. Read full review

Review: Profit Over People: Neoliberalism and Global Order

User Review  - bartosz_witkowski - Goodreads

Noam Chomsky's Profit Over People: Neoliberalism and Global Order is a collection of articles and essays on the topics of neoliberalism and American policy. The author defines neoliberalism as ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Introduction
7
Neoliberalism and Global Order
17
Consent without Consent Regimenting the Public Mind
41
The Passion for Free Markets
63
Market Democracy in a Neoliberal Order Doctrines and Reality
89
The Zapatista Uprising
119
The Ultimate Weapon
129
Hordes of Vigilantes
157
Index
169
Copyright

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About the author (1999)

Born in Philadelphia in 1928, NOAM CHOMSKY is known throughout the world for his political writings, activism, and for for his groundbreaking work in linguistics. A professor at Massachusetts Institute of Technology since 1955, Chomsky gained recognition in academic circles for his theory of transformational grammar, which drew attention to the syntactic universality of all human languages. But it is as a critic of unending war, corporate control and neoliberalism that Chomsky has become one of the country's most well known public intellectuals. The 1969 publication of "American Power and the New Mandarins" marked the beginning of Chomsky's rigorous public criticism of American hegemony and its lieges. Since then, with his tireless scholarship and an unflagging sense of moral responsibility, he has become one of the most influential writers in the world. Chomsky is the author of "Manufacturing Consent: The Political Economy of the Mass Media" (with Edward S. Herman), "Profit Over People: Neoliberalism and Global Order," and over one hundred other books. To this day Noam Chomsky remains an active and uncompromising voice of dissent.

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