Stochastic processes

Front Cover
The theory of stochastic processes has developed so much in the last twenty years that the need for a systematic account of the subject has been felt, particularly by students and instructors of probability. This book fills that need. While even elementary definitions and theorems are stated in detail, this is not recommended as a first text in probability and there has been no compromise with the mathematics of probability. Since readers complained that omission of certain mathematical detail increased the obscurity of the subject, the text contains various mathematical points that might otherwise seem extraneous. A supplement includes a treatment of the various aspects of measure theory. A chapter on the specialized problem of prediction theory has also been included and references to the literature and historical remarks have been collected in the Appendix.

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Contents

INTRODUCTION AND PROBABILITY BACKGROUND
1
DEFINITION OF A STOCHASTIC PROCESSPRINCIPAL
46
PROCESSES WITH MUTUALLY INDEPENDENT RAN
78
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About the author (1990)

Biography of Joseph L. Doob

Born in Cincinnati, Ohio on February 27, 1910, Joseph L. Doob studied for both his undergraduate and doctoral degrees at Harvard University. He was appointed to the University of Illinois in 1935 and remained there until his retirement in 1978.

Doob worked first in complex variables, then moved to probability under the initial impulse of H. Hotelling, and influenced by A.N Kolmogorov's famous monograph of 1933, as well as by Paul LA(c)vy's work.

In his own book Stochastic Processes (1953), Doob established martingales as a particularly important type of stochastic process. Kakutani's treatment of the Dirichlet problem in 1944, combining complex variable theory and probability, sparked off Doob's interest in potential theory, which culminated in the present book.

(For more details see: http: //www.dartmouth.edu/~chance/Doob/conversation.html)

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