Illustrations of the Geology of Yorkshire: The mountain limestone district

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J. Murray, 1836 - Geology
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Page i - PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION of NEW SOUTH WALES and VAN DIEMAN'S LAND; accompanied by a Geological Map Sections, and Diagrams, and Figures of the Organic Remains. By PE DE STRZELECKI. 8vo. with coloured Map and numerous Plates, 24s. cloth. DIBDIN (THE REV. TF)-THE SUNDAY LIBRARY: Containing" nearly One Hundred Sermons, by eminent Divines.
Page xviii - Enough, if something from our hands have power To live, and act, and serve the future hour; And if, as toward the silent tomb we go, Through love, through hope, and faith's transcendent dower, We feel that we are greater than we know.
Page 121 - Every vein which intersects another, is newer than the one traversed, and is of later formation than all those which it traverses; of course, the oldest vein is traversed by all those that are of a posterior formation, and the newer veins always cross those that are older.
Page xv - Gilbertson, of Preston, a naturalist of high acquirements, who has for many years explored with exceeding diligence a region of mountain limestone remarkably rich in organic remains. The collection which he has amassed from the small district of Bolland is at this moment unrivalled, and he has done for me, without solicitation, what is seldom granted to the most urgent entreaty : he has sent me for deliberate examination, at convenient intervals, the whole of his magnificent collection, accompanied...
Page 170 - The wasting power of the atmosphere is very conspicuous in these rocks, seeking out their secret laminations ; working perpendicular furrows and horizontal cavities ; wearing away the bases ; and thus bringing a slow but sure destruction on the whole of the exposed masses. The rocks of Brimham are in this respect very remarkable, for they are truly in a state of ruin ; those that remain are but perishing monuments of what have been destroyed; and it is difficult to conceive circumstances of inanimate...
Page 198 - Linear, longitudinally and deeply furrowed; cells in the furrows, in quincunx, their apertures oval, prominent; (side furrows without cells). It appears to have been a tubular or folded membrane; the number of rows of cells differs in different specimens. No sign of bifurcation.
Page xiii - Explorations of three of the fine mountains which are visible from Florence Court gave us a complete section of the limestone series in Ireland, and while the forms of Ben Jochlin, Kulkeagh, and Belmore, seemed copied from Penyghent, Wildboar Fell, Water Crag, their constituent rocks were found closely analogous.
Page 97 - ... feet above the vale of the Eden and the plain of Carlisle, and the level beds of the red sandstone deposited in later times at the foot of the ancient escarpment, upon the relatively depressed portion of the same mountain limestone series.
Page xv - HIS MAGNIFICENT COLLECTION, accompanied by remarks dictated by long experience and a sound judgment. He had proposed to publish an account of his discoveries, and especially of the Crinoidea for which no man in Europe had equal materials, and had made a great number of careful drawings for the purpose ; but all these, as well as the specimens, he placed at my disposal — a striking proof of liberal and genuine devotion to science. An attentive examination of this rich collection rendered it unnecessary...
Page 161 - ... origin. On the limestone hills above Malham is a large piece of water, fed from an immense area of dry rocks which absorb the rain and yield a part of their stores to the elevated lake. Malham Water is on the line of the North Craven fault, overlooked on the north by the limestone ranges of Hard Flask and Fountains Fell, while from below it rises to the south the depressed band of the same limestone. The natural exit of the water is in this direction, as a superficial channel distinctly shews...