Concrete Vaulted Construction in Imperial Rome: Innovations in Context

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Cambridge University Press, Aug 8, 2005 - Architecture
Concrete Vaulted Construction in Imperial Rome examines methods and techniques that enabled builders to construct some of the most imposing monuments of ancient Rome. Focusing on structurally innovative vaulting and the factors that influenced its advancement, Lynne Lancaster also explores a range of related practices, including lightweight pumice as aggregate, amphoras in vaults, vaulting ribs, metal tie bars, and various techniques of buttressing. She provides the geological background of the local building stones and applies mineralogical analysis to determine material provenance, which in turn suggests trading patterns and land use. Lancaster also examines construction techniques in relation to the social, economic, and political contexts of Rome, in an effort to draw connections between changes in the building industry and the events that shaped Roman society from the early empire to late antiquity. This book was awarded the James R. Wiseman Book Award from the Archaeological Institute of America in 2007.
 

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Contents

I
xix
II
xx
III
xxi
IV
2
V
6
VI
8
VII
14
VIII
17
XXXIV
68
XXXV
71
XXXVI
73
XXXVII
75
XXXVIII
76
XXXIX
78
XL
86
XLI
87

IX
18
X
22
XI
25
XII
28
XIII
30
XIV
35
XV
35
XVI
35
XVIII
35
XIX
35
XX
36
XXI
37
XXII
42
XXIII
43
XXIV
45
XXV
45
XXVI
45
XXVII
45
XXVIII
48
XXX
50
XXXI
53
XXXII
60
XXXIII
66
XLII
90
XLIII
92
XLIV
84
XLV
88
XLVI
90
XLVII
93
XLVIII
88
XLIX
90
L
93
LI
96
LII
98
LIII
99
LIV
99
LV
99
LVI
107
LVIII
121
LX
135
LXI
135
LXIII
135
LXIV
141
LXV
145
LXVI
154
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Page iii - ... space frames. The forms being experimented with come from a closer knowledge of nature and the outgrowth of the constant search for order. Design habits leading to the concealment of structure have no place in this implied order. Such habits retard the development of art. I believe that in architecture, as in all art, the artist instinctively keeps the marks which reveal how a thing was done.

About the author (2005)

Lynne Lancaster is Associate Professor of Classics at Ohio University. A scholar of Roman archaeology and architecture, she has been awarded fellowships from the Samuel H. Kress Foundation, the M. Aylwin Cotton Foundation, and the American Academy in Rome.

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