Indian Tribes of the Lower Mississippi Valley and Adjacent Coast of the Gulf of Mexico, Issue 43

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1911 - Indians of North America - 387 pages
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Page 256 - ... occasions ; but as he would have to be detained there some time, he had left him in his stead. The Chief, thinking within himself that he was dead, ordered two well-proportioned young men to be brought, saying, that it was the usage of the country, when any lord died, to kill some persons, who should accompany and serve him on the way, on which account they were brought ; and he told him to command their heads to be struck off, that they might go accordingly to attend his friend and master.
Page 5 - Septentrionale de M. de La Sale; mises au jour par M. le chevalier Tonti, gouverneur du Fort Saint Louis, aux Islinois.
Page 224 - Ah, my God ! ah, my God !" M. du Codere drew his sword to defend him, when he was himself killed by a musket ball from another Indian whom he did not perceive. These barbarians spared but two of the French, a tailor and a carpenter, who were able to serve their wants. They did not treat badly either the negro slaves, or the Indians...
Page 267 - Idols, which are different figures of men and of animals, and for which they have a most profound veneration. Their Temple in shape resembles an earthen oven, a hundred feet in circumference. They enter it by a little door about four feet high, and not more than three in breadth. No window is to be seen there. The arched roof of the edifice is covered with three rows of mats, placed one upon the other, to prevent the rain from injuring the masonry. Above on the outside are three figures of eagles...
Page 103 - The princesses of the blood never espouse any but men of obscure family, and they have but one husband, but they have the right of dismissing him whenever it pleases them, and of choosing another among those of the nation, provided he has not made any other alliance among them. If the husband has been guilty of infidelity, the princess may have his head cut off in an instant; but she is not herself subject to the same law, for she may have as many lovers as she pleases, without the husband having...
Page 179 - The rewards to which they look forward, consist principally in feasting, and their chastisement in the privation of every pleasure. Thus they think that those who have been the faithful observers of their laws will be conducted into a region of pleasures, where all kinds of exquisite viands will be furnished them in abundance that their delightful and tranquil days will flow on in the midst of festivals, dances, and women; in short, they will revel in all imaginable pleasures.
Page 267 - ... feet in circumference. They enter it by a little door about four feet high, and not more than three in breadth. No window is to be seen there. The arched roof of the edifice is covered with three rows of mats, placed one upon the other, to prevent the rain from injuring the masonry. Above on the outside are three figures of eagles made of wood, and painted red, yellow, and white. Before the door is a kind of shed with folding doors, where the Guardian of the Temple is lodged...
Page 172 - The sun is the principal object of veneration to these people ; as they cannot conceive of anything which can be above this heavenly body, nothing else appears to them more worthy of their homage. It is for the same reason that the great Chief of this nation, who knows nothing on the earth more dignified than himself, takes the title of Brother of the Sun, and the credulity of the people maintains him in the despotic authority which he claims.
Page 267 - ... many flat baskets, very gorgeously painted, in which they preserve their idols. These are figures of men and women made of stone or baked clay, the heads and the tails of extraordinary serpents, some stuffed owls, some pieces of crystal, and some jawbones of large fish. In the year 1699 they had there a bottle and the foot of a glass, which they guarded as very precious.
Page 102 - Chief of this nation, who knows nothing on the earth more dignified than himself, takes the title of Brother of the Sun, and the credulity of the people maintains him in the despotic authority which he claims. To enable them. better to converse together, they raise a mound of artificial soil, on which they build his cabin, which is of the same construction as the temple. The door fronts the East, and every morning the great Chief honors by his presence the rising of his elder brother, and salutes...