Remarks on the Present System of Road-making; with Observations Deduced from Practice and Experience, with a View to the Revision of the Existing Laws, and the Introduction of Improvement in the Method of Making, Repairing and Preserving Roads, and Defending the Road Funds from Misapplication

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 1821 - Macadam roads - 196 pages
 

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Page 102 - That is, provided the substratum is sound? — No ; — -I should not care whether the substratum was soft or hard; I should rather prefer a soft one to a hard one.
Page 37 - The roads can never be rendered thus perfectly secure, until the following principles be fully understood, admitted, and acted upon: namely, that it is the native soil which really supports the weight of traffic : that while it is preserved in a dry state, it will carry any weight without sinking...
Page 32 - ... nothing is to be laid on the clean stone on pretence of binding; broken stone will combine by its own angles into a smooth solid surface that cannot be affected by vicissitudes of weather, or displaced by the action of wheels, which will pass over it without a jolt, and consequently without injury...
Page 40 - Where the materials of which the road itself is composed, properly selected, prepared, and laid, some of the inconveniences of this system might be avoided; but in the careless way in which this service is generally performed, the road is as open as a sieve to receive water ; which penetrates through the whole mass, is received and retained in the trench, whence the road is liable to give way in all changes of weather.
Page 42 - The thickness of such road is immaterial, as to its strength for carrying weight ; this object is already obtained by providing a dry surface, over which the road is to be placed as a covering, or roof, to preserve it in that state : experience having shewn, that if water passes through a road, and fill the native soil, the road, whatever may be its thickness, loses its support, and goes to pieces!.
Page 98 - that when that material is laid upon the road, it must remain in the situation in which it is placed without ever being moved again ; and what I find fault with in putting quantities of gravel on the road is that, before it becomes useful, it must move its situation, and be in constant motion...
Page 165 - A road much rounded is dangerous, particularly if the cross section approaches towards the segment of a circle, the slope in that case not being uniform, but increasing rapidly from the nature of the curve, as we depart from the middle or vertical line. The over-rounding of roads is also injurious to them, by either confining the heavy carriages to one track in the crown of the road, or, if they go upon the sides, by the greater wear they produce, from their constant tendency to move down the inclined...
Page 29 - ... put in shape, and a rake employed to smooth the surface, which will at the same time bring to the surface the remaining stone, and will allow the dirt to go down. When the road is so prepared, the stone that has been broken...
Page 39 - It has also been found, that roads placed upon a hard bottom, wear away more quickly than those which are placed upon a soft soil. This has been apparent upon roads where motives of economy, or other causes, have prevented the road being lifted to the bottom at once ; the wear has always been found to diminish, as soon as it was possible to remove the hard foundation. It is a known fact, that a road lasts much longer over a morass than when made over rock. The...
Page 57 - ... general improvement must be the employment of persons of superior ability and experience as superintending surveyors.

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