City Life

Front Cover
Simon and Schuster, Oct 10, 1996 - Architecture - 256 pages
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In City Life, Witold Rybczynski looks at what we want from cities, how they have evolved, and what accounts for their unique identities. In this vivid description of everything from the early colonial settlements to the advent of the skyscraper to the changes wrought by the automobile, the telephone, the airplane, and telecommuting, Rybczynski reveals how our urban spaces have been shaped by the landscapes and lifestyles of the New World.
 

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User Review  - jcbrunner - LibraryThing

Reading Rybczynski is like spelling his name. Fascinating and frustrating at the same time. His rambling style, excursions and personal anecdotes are interesting but ultimately distracting from the ... Read full review

City life: urban expectations in a new world

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Architectural and urban historian Rybczynski (The Most Beautiful House in the World, LJ 4/1/89) has something to say about the shape of American cities, how they got that way, and how they inevitably ... Read full review

Contents

PREFACE
11
The Measure of a Town
35
A New Uncrowded World
51
A Frenchman in New York
84
In the Land of the Dollar
110
Civic Art
131
High Hopes
149
Country Homes for City People 273
173
The New Downtown
197
The Best of Both Worlds
218
notes
237
INDEX
247
Copyright

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About the author (1996)

Witold Rybczynski has written about architecture and urbanism for The New York Times, Time, The Atlantic, and The New Yorker. He is the author of the critically acclaimed book Home and the award-winning A Clearing in the Distance, as well as The Biography of a Building, The Mysteries of the Mall, and Now I Sit Me Down. The recipient of the National Building Museum’s 2007 Vincent Scully Prize, he lives with his wife in Philadelphia, where he is emeritus professor of architecture at the University of Pennsylvania.