A Family Trust

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PublicAffairs, Nov 2, 2007 - Fiction - 336 pages
1 Review
Jonathan Yardley called A Family Trust "his longest, his most ambitious and his best… a book with serious purposes that manages to entertain at the same time…rich in carefully observed details, in quick, sharp perceptions that reveal more than one at first understands…a fine, satisfying, rewarding book, the work of a mature and accomplished novelist," upon the book's initial publication in 1978. The passing of Amos Rising, town elder and editor of The Dement Intelligencer, leaves the Rising family without a patriarch and the town with a hole in its center. The ambitions and talents of the Risings, the changing face of the town and the life of the spirited, intelligent, and attractive Dana Rising fill the pages of this extraordinary novel. Ward Just's A Family Trust is about the public face and private souls of America's Heartland in the same way his other novels are about Germany, Vietnam, or Washington D.C.

The time has come to bring A Family Trust back into print.
 

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User Review  - SigmundFraud - LibraryThing

loved it. the comfort of the 1950s Read full review

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Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
5
Section 3
7
Section 4
29
Section 5
31
Section 6
54
Section 7
55
Section 8
75
Section 14
180
Section 15
183
Section 16
188
Section 17
195
Section 18
201
Section 19
204
Section 20
231
Section 21
278

Section 9
81
Section 10
107
Section 11
127
Section 12
145
Section 13
159
Section 22
295
Section 23
305
Section 24
327
Copyright

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Page 10 - This view is equally erroneous with that which regards the Indian as a creature possessing the human form but divested of all other attributes of humanity, and whose traits of character, habits, modes of life, disposition, and savage customs disqualify him from the exercise of all rights and privileges, even those pertaining to life itself. Taking him as we find him, at peace or at war, at...
Page 10 - ... never trespassing upon the rights of others. This view is equally erroneous with that which regards the Indian as a creature possessing the human form but divested of all other attributes of humanity, and whose traits of character, habits, modes of life, disposition, and savage customs disqualify him from the exercise of all rights and privileges, even those pertaining to life itself.

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About the author (2007)

Ward Just is the author of twelve novels, including, most recently, A Dangerous Friend, the National Book Award finalist Echo House, and Jack Gance. His groundbreaking book about Vietnam, To What End, is available from PublicAffairs. Just was recently named one of the first recipients of a Berlin Prize Fellowship from the American Academy. He lives in Martha's Vineyard with his wife, Sarah Catchpole.

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