Growing Pains: The Autobiography of Emily Carr

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D & M Publishers, Dec 1, 2009 - Fiction - 400 pages
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This autobiography by Emily has been called "probably the finest... in a literary sense, ever written in Canada."

Completed just before Emily Carr died in 1945, Growing Pains tells the story of Carr’s life, beginning with her girlhood in pioneer Victoria and going on to her training as an artist in San Francisco, England and France. Also here is the frustration she felt at the rejection of her art by Canadians, of the years of despair when she stopped painting. She had to earn a living, and did so by running a small apartment-house, and her painful years of landladying and more joyful times raising dogs for sale, claimed all her time and energy. Then, towards the end of her life, came unexpected vindication and triumph when the Group of Seven accepted her as one of them. Throughout, the book is informed with Carr’s passionatate love of and connection with nature.

Carr is a natural storyteller whose writing is vivid and vital, informed by wit, nostalgic charm, an artist’s eye for description, a deep feeling for creatures and the foibles of humanity--all the things that made her previous books Klee Wyck and Book of Small so popular and critically acclaimed.

 

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Contents

foreword by Ira Dilworth
13
baptism
19
drawing and insubordination
29
the outdoor sketch class
46
beany
53
the roarats
62
coloursense
69
back to canada
94
leaving miss greensvincent square
145
pain and mrs radcliffethe vicarage
152
THE RADCLIFFEs ART AND DISTRICT visiTING
183
LONDON TASTED
191
BITTER GOODBYE
232
CARIBOO GOLD
241
VANCOUVER
250
LAWREN HARRIS
304

home again
103
love and poetry
111
aunt amelias pg house
118
letters of introduction
124
life class
131
GREEN
314
SEVENTIETH BIRTHDAY AND A KISS FOR CANADA
325
THE BOOK OF SMALL
332
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Page 13 - When the Present has latched its postern behind my tremulous stay, And the May month flaps its glad green leaves like wings, Delicate-filmed as new-spun silk, will the neighbours say, 'He was a man who used to notice such things'? If it be in the dusk when, like an eyelid's soundless blink, The dewfall-hawk comes crossing the shades to alight Upon the wind-warped upland thorn, a gazer may think, 'To him this must have been a familiar sight.
Page 13 - If I pass during some nocturnal blackness, mothy and warm, When the hedgehog travels furtively over the lawn, 10 One may say, "He strove that such innocent creatures should come to no harm, But he could do little for them; and now he is gone.
Page 13 - If, when hearing that I have been stilled at last, they stand at the door, Watching the full-starred heavens that winter sees, Will this thought rise on those who will meet my face no more, " He was one who had an eye for such mysteries " ? And will any say when my bell of quittance is heard in the gloom, And a crossing breeze cuts a pause in its outrollings, Till they rise again, as they were a new bell's boom, " He hears it not now, but used to notice such things ? " LATE LYRICS AND EARLIER APOLOGY...
Page 13 - He strove that such innocent creatures should come to no harm, But he could do little for them; and now he is gone.' If, when hearing that I have been stilled at last, they stand at the door, Watching the full-starred heavens that winter sees, Will this thought rise on those who will meet mv face no more, 'He was one who had an eye for such mysteries'?

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About the author (2009)

Emily Carr was born in Victoria, British Columbia, in 1871, and died there in 1945. She studied art in San Francisco, London and Paris. Except for a period of fifteen years when she was discouraged by the reception to her work, she was a commited painter. After 1927, when she was encouraged by the praise of the Group of Seven, interest in her paintings grew and she gained recognition as one of Canada’s most gifted artists. Now, nearly sixty years after her death, her reputation continues to grow.

Robin Laurence is an award-winning freelance writer, critic and curator based in Vancouver. She has a B.F.A. in studio arts and an M.A. in art history, and was educated at the University of Calgary, the University of Victoria, the Banff School of Fine Arts and the Instituto Allende in Mexico. She has written dozens of essays for local and regional galleries, and her articles on art have appeared in many magazines. Laurence was also visual arts critic for the Georgia Strait and the Vancouver Sun.

Ira Dilworth taught English at Victoria High School from 1915-26 and was the school's principal from 1926-34. He was a friend and mentor of the great Emily Carr, whose writing career he promoted as her literary agent. He taught at UBC for four years before joining CBC Radio, directing the corporation's BC operations from 1938-46. Dilworth founded the CBC Vancouver Orchestra in 1938 and in 1956 became director of the CBC English language network.

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