Free Culture: How Big Media Uses Technology and the Law to Lock Down Culture and Control Creativity

Front Cover
Penguin, 2004 - Social Science - 345 pages
112 Reviews

Lawrence Lessig, “the most important thinker on intellectual property in the Internet era” (The New Yorker), masterfully argues that never before in human history has the power to control creative progress been so concentrated in the hands of the powerful few, the so-called Big Media. Never before have the cultural powers- that-be been able to exert such control over what we can and can't do with the culture around us. Our society defends free markets and free speech; why then does it permit such top-down control? To lose our long tradition of free culture, Lawrence Lessig shows us, is to lose our freedom to create, our freedom to build, and, ultimately, our freedom to imagine.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
42
4 stars
44
3 stars
21
2 stars
4
1 star
1

He is a great writer too. - Goodreads
The writing is not terribly "creative". - Goodreads
New introduction to this subject for me. - Goodreads

Review: Free Culture: The Nature and Future of Creativity

User Review  - Alex - Goodreads

I ended up skim-reading from about half way as I found it got repetitive and relied very heavily on anecdotes and stories. But regardless, this book presented some interesting new ideas that I had ... Read full review

Review: Free Culture: The Nature and Future of Creativity

User Review  - Pamela Day - Goodreads

Mad crazy respect for this man. Brilliant read. Read full review

All 58 reviews »

Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
Creators
21
Mere Copyists
31
Catalogs
48
Piracy
62
Founders
85
Recorders
95
Collectors
108
Harms
183
Eldred
213
Eldred II
248
CONCLUSION
257
Us Now
276
Them Soon
287
NOTES
307
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
331

Property
116
Chimera
177

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2004)

Lawrence Lessig is a professor at Stanford Law School and the founder of the Stanford Center for Internet and Society. The author of The Future of Ideas and Code and Other Laws of Cyberspace, he is the chair of the Creative Commons project. A graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, Cambridge University, and Yale Law School, he has clerked for Judge Richard Posner of the U.S. 7th Circuit Court of Appeals and Judge Antonin Scalia of the U.S. Supreme Court.

Bibliographic information