Report on Education in Europe

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Lydia R. Bailey, 1839 - 666 pages
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Page 646 - Aristotle, and Plato, and Thucydides, and Cicero, and Tacitus are most untruly called ancient writers ; they are virtually our own countrymen and contemporaries, but have the advantage which is enjoyed by intelligent travellers, that their observation has been exercised in a field out of the reach of common men ; and that having thus seen in a manner with our eyes what we cannot see for ourselves, their conclusions are such as bear upon our own circumstances, while their information has all the charm...
Page 645 - Expel Greek and Latin from your schools, and you confine the views of the existing generation to themselves and their immediate predecessors; you will cut off so many centuries of the world's experience, and place us in the same state as if the human race had first come into existence in the year 1500.
Page 647 - ... arrangement of our words, and to the substitution of foreign idioms in the place of such as are national ; it obliges us to caricature every sentence that we render, by turning what is, in its original dress, beautiful and natural, into something which is neither Greek nor English, stiff, obscure, and flat, exemplifying all the faults incident to language, and excluding every excellence. The exercise of translation, on the other hand, meaning, by translation, the expressing of an entire sentence...
Page 649 - ... subject to a succession of influences, some accidental, others regular; to see and remember what critical seasons of improvement have been neglected, what besetting evils have been wantonly aggravated by wickedness or folly. In short, the pupil may be furnished as it were with certain formulae, which shall enable him to read all history beneficially ; which shall teach him what to look for in it, how to judge of it, and how to apply it.
Page 649 - Let him be taught to analyze the subject thus presented to him ; to trace back institutions, civil and religious, to their origin ; to explore the elements of the national character, as now exhibited in maturity, in the vicissitudes of the nation's fortune, and the moral and physical qualities of its race ; to observe how the morals and the mind of the people have been subject to a succession of influences, some accidental, others regular ; to see and remember what critical seasons of improvement...
Page 646 - ... studies in the general liberality of its tastes and comparative comprehensiveness of its views and notions. All this supposes, indeed, that classical instruction should be sensibly conducted ; it requires that a classical teacher should be fully acquainted with modern history and modern literature, no less than with those of Greece and Rome. What is, or perhaps what used to be, called a mere scholar, cannot possibly communicate to his pupils the main advantages of a classical education. The knowledge...
Page 205 - According to it, a primary school is one in which youth is instructed in the first principles of knowledge, such as reading, writing, arithmetic, and the Dutch language, or the more advanced branches, such as the French, or other modern languages, or the ancient languages, geography, history, and other subjects of that description.
Page 450 - Those who intend to study theology or philology, translate a portion of one of the historical books of the Old Testament, or a psalm, into Latin, adding a grammatical analysis. The time allowed for the several written exercises is as follows: For the German, five hours; Latin composition, five hours; Latin extempore, one hour; Greek translation, three hours; translation from Latin into Greek, two hours; French composition, four hours; mathematical exercises, five hours; Hebrew exercises, when required,...
Page 647 - This favourite notion of filling boys with useful information is likely, we think, to be productive of some mischief. It is a caricature of the principles of inductive philosophy, which, while it taught the importance of a knowledge of facts, never imagined that this knowledge was of itself equivalent to wisdom. Now it is not so much our object to give boys "useful information...
Page 645 - ... so many centuries of the world's experience, and place us in the same state as if the human race had first come into existence in the year 1500. For it is nothing to say that...

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