Voyage Round the World: Embracing the Principal Events of the Narrative of the United States Exploring Expedition in One Volume : Illustrated with One Hundred and Seventy-eight Engravings on Wood

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Geo. W. Gorton, 1849 - Antarctica - 668 pages
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Page 274 - M., when we were within two and a half miles of the icy cliffs by which the land was bounded on all sides. These were from one hundred and fifty to two hundred feet in height, quite perpendicular, and there was no appearance whatever of rocks ; all was covered with ice and snow.
Page 273 - Under these circumstances we feel ourselves obliged to report that, in our opinion, a few days more of such exposure as they have already undergone, would reduce the number of the crew by sickness to such an extent as to hazard the safety of the ship and the lives of all on board.
Page 223 - When the good people of Sydney looked abroad in the morning, they were much astonished to see two men-of-war lying among their shipping, which had entered their harbor in spite of the difficulties of the channel, without being reported, and unknown to the pilots.
Page v - Expedition to be fitted out for the purpose of exploring and surveying that sea, as well to determine the existence of all doubtful islands and shoals, as to discover and accurately fix the position of those which lie in or near the track of our vessels in that quarter, and may have escaped the observation of scientific navigators.
Page 521 - Nothing can exceed the beauty of these waters and their safety. Not a shoal exists within the Straits of Juan de Fuca, Admiralty inlet, or Hood's canal, that can in any way interrupt their navigation by a 74-gun ship.
Page 278 - AM, when we found any further progress quite impossible. I then judged that it was seven or eight miles distant. The day was remarkably clear, and the land very distinct. By measurement, we made the extent of coast of the Antarctic Continent, which, was then in sight, seventy-five miles, and by approximate measurement, three thousand feet high. It was entirely covered with snow. Longitude at noon, 106 18' 42" E., latitude 65 59' 40'' S., variation 57 5
Page 49 - It is impossible to fancy anything in human nature• more filthy. They are an ill-shapen and ugly race. They have little or no Idea of the relative value of articles, even of those that one would suppose were of the utmost use to them, such as iron and glass-ware. A glass bottle broken into pieces, is valued as much as a knife. Red flannel, torn into stripes, pleases them more than in the piece ; they wound it around their heads, as a kind of turban, and it was amusing to see their satisfaction...
Page 623 - ... estimation. In their houses they are but scantily clothed, though women of rank have always a large number of rings on their fingers, some of which are of great value, as well as earrings of fine gold. They wear no stockings, but have on Chinese slippers, or Spanish shoes. They are as capable of governing as their husbands, and in many cases more so, as they associate with the slaves, from whom they obtain some knowledge of Christendom, and of the habits and customs of other nations, which they...
Page 286 - The vast number of ice-islands conclusively points out that there is some extensive nucleus which retains them in their position; for I can see no reason why the ice should not be disengaged from islands, if they were such, as happens in all other cases in like latitudes. The formation of the coast is different from what would probably be found near islands, soundings being obtained in comparatively shoal water; and the color of the water also indicates that it is not like other southern lands, abrupt...
Page 49 - ... small, and ill-made. There is, in fact, little difference between the size of the ankle and leg ; and when standing, the skin at the knee hangs in a large, loose fold. In some, the muscles of the leg appear almost wanting, and possess very little strength. This want of...

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