The Thirty Years War

Front Cover
New York Review of Books, 2005 - History - 520 pages
Europe in 1618 was riven between Protestants and Catholics, Bourbon and Hapsburg--as well as empires, kingdoms, and countless principalities. After angry Protestants tossed three representatives of the Holy Roman Empire out the window of the royal castle in Prague, world war spread from Bohemia with relentless abandon, drawing powers from Spain to Sweden into a nightmarish world of famine, disease, and seemingly unstoppable destruction.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

II
11
III
69
IV
101
V
137
VI
192
VII
223
VIII
259
IX
325
X
383
XI
414
XII
445
XIII
485
XIV
507
XV
511
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2005)

Cicely Veronica Wedgwood (1910-1997) was born into an innovative and intellectual English family. Her father, a direct descendant of the potter Josiah Wedgwood, was the chief general manager of the London and North Eastern Railway and her mother was a novelist and travel writer. After success at Oxford, Wedgwood rejected an academic career and took up writing instead. She published her first history, The Thirty Years War (1938), before her thirtieth birthday, and in the years that followed wrote a succession of chronicles of seventeenth-century Europe that made her one of the most popular and best-known historians in Britain. Her most important works include The King's Peace; The King's War; and William the Silent: William of Nassau, Prince of Orange, 1533-1584, which won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for biography in 1944. She was a member of the Institute for Advanced Studies, a Dame of the British Empire, and in 1969 became the third woman to be appointed a member of the British Order of Merit.

Anthony Grafton is Henry Putnam University Professor of History and the Humanities at Princeton University. His most recent book is The Culture of Correction in Renaissance Europe.

Bibliographic information