National History of the War for the Union, Civil, Military and Naval: Founded on Official and Other Authentic Documents, Volume 1

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Johnson, Fry and Company, 1862 - United States
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Page 126 - Texas, by combinations too powerful to be suppressed by the ordinary course of judicial proceedings or by the powers vested in the marshals by law...
Page 498 - States; but to defend and maintain the supremacy of the Constitution and to preserve the Union with all the dignity, equality and rights of the several States unimpaired; that as soon as these objects are accomplished the war ought to cease.
Page 89 - I therefore consider that in view of the Constitution and the laws the Union is unbroken, and to the extent of my ability I shall take care, as the Constitution itself expressly enjoins upon me, that the laws of the Union be faithfully executed in all the States.
Page 89 - The power confided to me will be used to hold, occupy, and possess the property and places belonging to the Government and to collect the duties and imposts; but beyond what may be necessary for these objects, there will be no invasion, no using of force against or among the people anywhere.
Page 48 - If any one attempts to haul down the American flag, shoot him on the spot.
Page 89 - The course here indicated will be followed, unless current events and experience shall show a modification or change to be proper...
Page 90 - Will you hazard so desperate a step while there is any possibility that any portion of the ills you fly from have no real existence? Will you, while the certain ills you fly to are greater than all the real ones you fly from, will you risk the commission of so fearful a mistake? All profess to be content in the Union if all constitutional rights can be maintained.
Page 92 - This country, with its institutions, belongs to the people who inhabit it. Whenever they shall grow weary of the existing Government, they can exercise their constitutional right of amending, or their revolutionary right to dismember or overthrow it.
Page 91 - Unanimity is impossible; the rule of a minority, as a permanent arrangement, is wholly inadmissible ; so that, rejecting the majority principle, anarchy or despotism in some form is all that is left.
Page 34 - Constitution, are hereby repealed ; and that the Union now subsisting between South Carolina and other States, under the name of the United States of America, is hereby dissolved.

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