A History of Greece to the Death of Alexander the Great

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Macmillan and Company, limited, 1913 - Alexander - 909 pages
 

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Contents

Jo Phoenician Intercourse with Greece
76
Greek Reconstruction of Early Greek History
78
CHAPTER II
86
Colonies on the Coasts of the Euxine Propontis and North Aegean
89
Colonies in the Western Mediterranean
93
Growth of Trade and Maritime Enterprise
106
Influence of Lydia on Greece I lo 6 The Opening of Egypt I 14
114
Cyrene
116
GROWTH OF SPARTA sect race 1 Sparta and her Constitution
120
Spartan Conquest of Messenia
125
Internal Development of Sparta and her Institutions
130
The Cretan Constitutions
136
The Supremacy and Decline of Argos The Olympian Games
139
Democratic Movements Lawgivers and Tyrants I44
144
The Tyrannies of Central Greece
148
The Sacred War The Panhellenic Games
157
CHAPTER IV
163
Foundation of the Athenian Commonwealth
168
The Aristocracy in the Seventh Century
171
The Legislation of Solon and the Foundation of Democracy
180
CHAPTER V
190
Athens under Pisistratus
192
Growth of Sparta and the Peloponnesian League 2ca2
202
Fall of the Pisistratids and Intervention of Sparta
204
King Cleomenes and the Second Spartan Intervention
208
Reform of Cleisthenes 21 I
211
First Victories of the Democracy
216
CHAPTER VI
219
The Persian Conquest of Asiatic Greece
229
sect Page 3 The Persian Conquest of Egypt Polycrates of Samos
232
Ionia under Darius
234
Conquest of Thrace
238
The Ionic Revolt against Persia
241
Second and Third European Expeditions of Darius Battle of Marathon
247
Struggle of Athens and Aegina
258
Growth of the Athenian Democracy
260
1o Athens to be a Seapower
263
CHAPTER VII
265
Preparations of Greece
269
Battles of Thermopylae and Artemisium
271
Battle of Salamis
277
Consequences of Salamis
282
Preparations for another Campaign
285
Battle of Plataea
289
Battle of Mycale and Capture of Sestos
295
Gelon Tyrant of Syracuse
296
ro The Carthaginian Invasion of Sicily and the Battle of Himera
300
Syracuse and Acragas under Hieron and Theron
304
Religious Movements in the Sixth Century 31 I
311
Spread of the Orphic Religion
316
Ionian Reason
319
CHAPTER VIII
322
The Confederacy of Delos
328
The Fortification of Athens and the Piraeus
330
Ostracism and Death of Themistocles
334
The Confederacy of Delos becomes an Athenian Empire
336
Policy and Ostracism of Cimon
342
CHAPTER X
387
General View of the
396
The Plague
403
The Siege and Capture of Plataea
409
Warfare in Western Greece
418
Nicias and Cleon Politics at Athens
425
Athenian Capture of Nisaea
440
Negotiations for Peace
453
SECT Page 3 The Sailing of the Sicilian Expedition
466
Siege of Syracuse 414 B C
471
The Second Expedition
477
Consequences of the Sicilian Catastrophe
484
ric Page 131 Coin of Rhodes
488
The Oligarchic Revolution
489
Fall of the Four Hundred The Polity The Democracy Restored
493
Coin of Colophon
498
Downfall of the Athenian Empire
499
Rule of the Thirty and Restoration of the Democracy
507
View of Phyle from a photograph by Dr Leaf Hellenic Society
509
Coin of Eleusis 51 I
511
The Kings Peace
549
Coin of Clazomenae
550
Alliance Coin of Ephesus
553
Alliance coin of Samos
554
CHAPTER XIII
555
Coin of Chalcidian League
558
Alliance of Athens and Thebes
561
The Second Athenian League and the Theban Reforms
564
Coin of Euboea
565
The Battle of Naxos and the Peace of Callias
567
Athens under the Restored Democracy
574
Portrait head of Socrates
577
Portrait head of Isocrates
584
CHAPTER XIV
591
Plan of Leuctra based on plan in G B Grundys Plataea
594
Policy of Thebes in Southern Greece Arcadia and Messenia
598
View of Megalopolis photograph
601
Coin of Arcadian League
602
Coin of Messene
605
The Arcadian Gate Messene photograph
606
Coin of Argos
609
Policy and Action of Thebes in Northern Greece 61 2
612
Coin of Larissa
613
The Battle of Mantinea
619
The Last Expedition of Agesilaus
626
Coin of Cyrene
628
CHAPTER XV
629
Coin of Syracuse
630
Ziz coin of Panormus
633
Carthaginian Conquest of Acragas
635
Plan of Acragas based on plan in Freemans History of Sicily
636
Rise of Dionysius
639
First Years of Dionysius
642
First Punic War of Dionysius
648
Second Punic War and Sicel Conquests of Dionysius
656
The Empire of Dionysius
658
Death of Dionysius Estimate of his Work
663
Dionysius the Younger
666
1o Dion
669
Timoleon
673
Events in Great Greece
679
CHAPTE R XVI
681
Philip II of Macedonia
683
Mausolus of Caria
688
Phocis and the Sacred War
694
The Advance of Macedonia
701
Peace of Philocrates
708
Interval of Peace and Preparations for War 3461 b c
715
Battle of Chaeronea
723
The Synedrion of the Greeks Philips Death
732
CHAPTER XVII
738
Alexanders Campaigns in Thrace and Illyria
740
Alexanders Second Descent on Greece
743
Preparations for Alexanders Persian Expedition
747
Conquest of Asia Minor
750
sect page 6 Battle of Issus
757
Conquest of Syria
763
Conquest of Egypt
772
Battle of Gaugamela Arbela and Conquest of Babylonia
774
Io Conquest of Susiana and Persis
779
Death of Darius
782
Spirit of Alexanders Policy as Lord of Asia
785
CHAPTER XVIII
787
The Conquest of India
798
Alexanders Return to Babylon
813
Preparations for Arabian Expedition and the Death of Alexander
818
Greece under Macedonia
823
The Episode of Harpalus and the Greek Revolt
829
Aristotle and Alexander
833
CHRONOLOGICAL TABLE
837
NOTES AND REFERENCES 85
851
396
874
INDEX +
885
409
887
422
893
429
904
Copyright

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Popular passages

Page 405 - And we have not forgotten to provide for our weary spirits many relaxations from toil; we have regular games and sacrifices throughout the year; at home the style of our life is refined; and the delight which we daily feel in all these things helps to banish melancholy.
Page 405 - And we shall assuredly not be without witnesses ; there are mighty monuments of our power which will make us the wonder of this and of succeeding ages...
Page 406 - I would have you day by day fix your eyes upon the greatness of Athens, until you become filled with the love of her ; and when you are impressed by the spectacle of her glory, reflect that this empire has been acquired by men who knew their duty and had the courage to do it...
Page 583 - To sum up : I say that Athens is the school of Hellas, and that the individual Athenian in his own person seems to have the power of adapting himself to the most varied forms of action with the utmost versatility and grace.
Page 807 - Porus. The news that the Cathaeans, a free and warlike people, whom Porus and Abisares had, some time before, failed to conquer, were determined to give him battle, diverted Alexander from the pursuit. He Capture of advanced against their chief town Sangala, strongly walled and pro- Sangala. tected on one side by a hill and on the other by a lake. It was probably near Amritsar, to the north-west of Lahore. The Cathaeans, supported by some neighbouring tribes, had made a stockade with a triple line...
Page 576 - State: for truly, the she-dogs, as the proverb says, are as good as their she-mistresses, and the horses and asses have a way of marching along with all the rights and dignities of freemen; and they will run at anybody who comes in their way if he does not leave the road clear for them: and all things are just ready to burst with liberty.
Page 405 - An Athenian citizen does not neglect the state because he takes care of his own household; and even those of us who are engaged in business have a very fair idea of politics. We alone regard a man who takes no interest in public affairs, not as a harmless, but as a useless character; and if few of us are originators, we are all sound judges of policy.
Page 405 - Our city is thrown open to the world; and we never expel a foreigner, or prevent him from seeing or learning anything of which the secret if revealed to an enemy might profit him. We rely not upon management or trickery, but upon our own hearts and hands. And in the matter of education, whereas they from early youth are always undergoing laborious exercises which are to make them brave, we live at ease, and yet are equally ready to face the perils which they face.
Page 363 - You think that your empire is confined to your allies, but I say that of the two divisions of the world accessible to man, the land and the sea, there is one of which you are absolute masters, and have, or may have, the dominion to any extent which you please. Neither the great King nor any nation on earth can hinder a navy like yours from penetrating whithersoever you choose to sail.
Page 752 - Persian panoplies to Athens, as an offering to Athena on the Acropolis, with this dedication : " Alexander. son of Philip, and the Greeks (except the Lacedaemonians), from the barbarians of Asia." But Athens had no zeal for the cause of the Greeks and Alexander against the barbarians. The victor entrusted the satrapy of Hellespontine Phrygia to Callas, making no change in the method of the Persian administraSuimission tion ; and marched southward to occupy the satrapy of Lydia and of Lydia.

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