The Preaching of Islam: A History of the Propagation of the Muslim Faith

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A. Constable and Company, 1896 - Islam - 388 pages
 

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how did the preaching of Islam start?

Contents

I
3
III
10
IV
44
V
89
VI
114
VIII
127
X
179
XI
187
XII
210
XIII
244
XIV
295
XV
334

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Page 55 - ... that we will not harbour any spy in our churches or houses, or conceal any enemy of the Muslims. That we will not teach our children the Qur'an; that we will not make a show of the Christian religion nor invite any one to embrace it; that we will not prevent any of our kinsmen from embracing Islam, if they so desire. That we will honour the Muslims and rise up in our assemblies when they wish to take their seats; that we will not imitate them in our dress, either in the cap, turban, sandals,...
Page 3 - It is the spirit of truth in the hearts of believers which cannot rest, unless it manifests itself in thought, word, and deed, which is not satisfied till it has carried its message to every human soul, till what it believes to be the truth is accepted as the truth by all members of the human family.
Page 107 - But the victories and the losses of Justinian were alike pernicious to mankind; and such was the desolation of Africa, that in many parts a stranger might wander whole days without meeting the face either of a friend or an enemy.
Page 355 - God is the third of three: for there is no God besides one God; and if they refrain not from what they say, a painful torment shall surely be inflicted on such of them as are unbelievers.
Page 26 - He it is who hath sent his apostle with guidance and the religion of truth, that, though they hate it who join other gods with God, He may make it victorious over every other religion.
Page 6 - Moreover it is not in the cruelties of the persecutor or the fury of the fanatic that we should look for the evidences of the missionary spirit of Islam, any more than in the exploits of that mythical personage, the Muslim warrior with sword in one hand and Qur'an in the other, — but in the quiet, unobtrusive labours of the preacher and the trader who have carried their faith into every | quarter of the globe.
Page 349 - Say, If your fathers, and your sons, and your brethren, and your wives, and your relations, and your substance which...
Page 128 - Turkish government, unlike the civil power of the Byzantine empire, never interfered), was left entirely in his hands and those of the grand Synod which he could summon whenever he pleased; and hereby he could decide all matters of faith and dogma without fear of interference on the part of the state. As a recognised officer of the imperial government, he could do much for the alleviation of the oppressed, by bringing the acts of unjust governors to the notice of the Sultan. The Greek bishops in...
Page 231 - To these poor people, fishermen, hunters, pirates, and lowcaste tillers of the soil, Islam came as a revelation from on high. It was the creed of the ruling race, its missionaries were men of zeal who brought the gospel of the unity of God and the equality of man in its sight to a despised and neglected population.
Page 214 - Musulman should be exempt from the jizya, or poll-tax. Information of this came to the ears of the people at large, and great numbers of Hindus presented themselves, and were admitted to the honour of Islam. Thus they came forward day by day from every quarter, and, adopting the faith, were exonerated from the jizya, and were favoured with presents and honours.

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