Andersonvilles of the North: The Myths and Realities of Northern Treatment of Civil War Confederate Prisoners

Front Cover
University of North Texas Press, 2008 - History - 278 pages
1 Review
Andersonvilles of the North, by James M. Gillispie, represents the first broad study to argue that the image of Union prison officials as negligent and cruel to Confederate prisoners is severely flawed. This study is not an attempt to "whitewash" Union prison policies or make light of Confederate prisoner mortality. But once the careful reader disregards unreliable postwar polemics, and focuses exclusively on the more reliable wartime records and documents from both Northern and Southern sources, then a much different, less negative, picture of Northern prison life emerges. While life in Northern prisons was difficult and potentially deadly, no evidence exists of a conspiracy to neglect or mistreat Southern captives. Confederate prisoners' suffering and death were due to a number of factors, but it would seem that Yankee apathy and malice were rarely among them.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

Review: Andersonvilles of the North: The Myths and Realities of Northern Treatment of Civil War Confederate Prisoners

User Review  - Mom Coulongue - Goodreads

Wow! this was an eye-opener... Even though I have read many Civil War books, I had never been aware of these prisons. This author goes to great reasearch and hard thinking to express his and the ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
1 Servants of the Devil and Jeff Davis
6
2 The Lost Cause and the Southern Side of the POW Debate
27
3 Continuity and Change
51
4 Union Policies Regarding Prisoners of War
71
Photo Section
108
5 Federal Policies at the Four Major Prisons in Illinois and Indiana
109
6 Federal Policies at the Major Ohio Prisons
153
7 Point Lookout Fort Delaware and Elmira
178
8 The Omnipresent Specter of Disease
217
Conclusion
244
Appendix A
247
Appendix B
249
Bibliography
251
Index
273
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2008)

James M. Gillispie teaches history at Sampson Community College in Clinton, North Carolina.

Bibliographic information