Italian Hours

Front Cover
John Beaufoy Publishing, 2009 - Biography & Autobiography - 306 pages

Henry James was a renowned observer of European culture, in both his fiction and in his life. In particular, he loved Italy, visiting it 14 times during his lifetime and setting several of his novels in the country. Between 1873 and 1909, he also wrote numerous essays and travelogues that were ultimately collected into one volume and published as Italian Hours. James is famous for his fine perception and baroque prose and both are found in abundance in Italian Hours. As one would expect, he is a wonderful cultural critic, providing passionate and discerning reviews of the highlights of Italy's art and architecture. He also presents a surprisingly familiar view of the changes that time and tourism were bringing to modern Italy.For all of his acute insights, Italian Hours is, above all, an affair of the heart and will resonate with anyone who shares his love of the country. Stanfords Travel Classics feature some of the finest historical travel writing in the English language, with authors hailing from both sides of the Atlantic. Every title has been rest in a contemporary typeface and has been printed to a high quality production specification, to create a series that every lover of fine travel literature will want to collect and keep.

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About the author (2009)

Henry James, American novelist and literary critic, was born in 1843 in New York City. Psychologist-philosopher William James was his brother. By the age of 18, he had lived in France, England, Switzerland, Germany, and New England. In 1876, he moved to London, having decided to live abroad permanently. James was a prolific writer; his writings include 22 novels, 113 tales, 15 plays, approximately 10 books of criticism, and 7 travel books. His best-known works include Daisy Miller, The Turn of the Screw, The Portrait of a Lady, The Ambassadors, and The American Scene. His works of fiction are elegant and articulate looks at Victorian society; while primarily set in genteel society, James subtlely explores class issues, sexual repression, and psychological distress. Henry James died in 1916 in London. The James Memorial Stone in Poet's Corner, Westminster Abbey, commemorates him.

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