The Works of Archimedes

Front Cover
Courier Corporation, 2002 - Mathematics - 377 pages
4 Reviews
The complete works of antiquity's great geometer appear here in a highly accessible English translation by a distinguished scholar. Remarkable for his range of thought and his mastery of treatment, Archimedes addressed such topics as the famous problems of the ratio of the areas of a cylinder and an inscribed sphere; the measurement of a circle; the properties of conoids, spheroids, and spirals; and the quadrature of the parabola. This edition offers an informative introduction with many valuable insights into the ancient mathematician's life and thought as well as the views of his contemporaries. Modern mathematicians, physicists, science historians, and logicians will find this volume a source of timeless fascination. Unabridged reprint of the classic 1897 edition, with supplement of 1912.
  

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Review: The Works of Archimedes

User Review  - RX - Goodreads

Started on it. Ended up reading 50 pages on the history of the various manuscripts. I regret that. Read full review

Review: The Works of Archimedes

User Review  - Goodreads

Started on it. Ended up reading 50 pages on the history of the various manuscripts. I regret that. Read full review

Contents

I
xv
II
xxiii
III
xxxix
IV
xl
V
xlvii
VI
lii
VII
liv
VIII
lxvii
XXIII
cxi
XXIV
cxiii
XXV
cxxiii
XXVI
cxlii
XXVII
clv
XXVIII
1
XXIX
56
XXX
91

IX
lxviii
X
lxix
XI
lxxi
XII
lxxii
XIII
lxxiii
XIV
lxxiv
XV
lxxvii
XVI
lxxx
XVII
lxxxiv
XVIII
xc
XIX
c
XX
cv
XXI
cvii
XXII
cx
XXXI
98
XXXII
99
XXXIII
151
XXXIV
189
XXXV
203
XXXVI
221
XXXVII
233
XXXVIII
253
XXXIX
263
XL
301
XLI
319
XLII
326
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Archimedes was a mathematician and inventor, born in Syracuse, Sicily, about 287 B.C. He became famous for his law of the lever and for inventing the catapult, parabolic mirror, and the mechanical crane that was capable of capsizing a ship by overturning it. These inventions were designed to defend Syracuse during the Second Punic War, which were waged between Rome and Carthage. While Archimedes made fundamental contributions to physics, his greatest contributions were to theoretical mathematics. Some of his works have come down to us. When Syracuse was taken in 212 B.C., Archimedes was killed by the Roman soldiers, being at the time intent upon a mathematical problem.

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