Descartes Among the Scholastics

Front Cover
BRILL, Jun 22, 2011 - Philosophy - 358 pages
Descartes among the Scholastics takes the position that philosophical systems cannot be studied adequately apart from their intellectual context: philosophers accept, modify, or reject doctrines whose meaning and significance are given in a particular culture. Thus, the volume treats Cartesian philosophy as a reaction against, as well as an indebtedness to, scholastic philosophy and touches on many topics shared by Cartesian and late scholastic philosophy: matter and form, causation, infinity, place, time, void, and motion; the substance of the heavens; principles of metaphysics (such as unity, principle of individuation, truth and falsity). One moves from within Cartesian philosophy and its intellectual context in the seventeenth century, to living philosophical debate between Descartes and his contemporaries, to its first reception.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Objections and Replies
13
2 Descartes and the Scotists
71
3 Ideas before and after Descartes
101
4 The Cartesian Destiny of Form and Matter and Its Critics
127
Three Kinds of Corpuscularians
157
6 Scholastics and the New Astronomy on the Substance of the Heavens
179
The Eucharist
217
The Extension and Unity of the Universe
241
9 Cartesians Gassendists and Censorship
267
10 The Cogito in the Seventeenth Century
295
Bibliography
331
INDEX
351
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Roger Ariew, Ph.D. (1976) in Philosophy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, is Professor and Chair of the Department of Philosophy at the University of South Florida. He has published extensively on the relations between philosophy, science, and society in the early modern period.