Witness: A Hunkpapha Historian's Strong-Heart Song of the Lakotas

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U of Nebraska Press, Nov 1, 2013 - Social Science - 824 pages

¾ Josephine Waggonerês writings offer a unique perspective on the Lakota. Witness will become a widely referenced primary source. Emily Levine has meticulously examined all known collections of Waggonerês manuscripts, sometimes comparing handwritten drafts with multiple typed copies to preserve information in full. Levineês extensive notes are well chosen and informative. Witness will interest both specialist and popular audiences. ãRaymond DeMallie, Chancellorsê Professor of Anthropology and American Indian Studies at Indiana University¾

During the 1920s and 1930s, Josephine Waggoner (1871_1943), a Lakota woman who had been educated at Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute in Virginia, grew increasingly concerned that the history and culture of her people were being lost as elders died without passing along their knowledge. A skilled writer, Waggoner set out to record the lifeways of her people and correct much of the misinformation about them spread by white writers, journalists, and scholars of the day. To accomplish this task, she traveled to several Lakota and Dakota reservations to interview chiefs, elders, traditional tribal historians, and other tribal members, including women.¾¾

Published for the first time and augmented by extensive annotations, Witness offers a rare participantês perspective on nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Lakota and Dakota life. The first of Waggonerês two manuscripts presented here includes extraordinary firsthand and as-told-to historical stories by tribal members, such as accounts of life in the Powder River camps and at the agencies in the 1870s, the experiences of a mixed-blood HÏ?kpap?a girl at the first off-reservation boarding school, and descriptions of traditional beliefs. The second manuscript consists of Waggonerês sixty biographies of Lakota and Dakota chiefs and headmen based on eyewitness accounts and interviews with the men themselves. Together these singular manuscripts provide new and extensive information on the history, culture, and experiences of the Lakota and Dakota peoples.

 

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This is an outstanding book. Josephine Waggoner has compiled an exhaustive history of the Lakota, and is a beautiful, poetic writer. Emily Levine has supplemented it with great notes and background. Terrific reading and a solid reference book on the Lakota people.

Contents

List of Illustrations
xi
Foreword by Lynne Allen
xvii
Editors Introduction by Emily Levine
xxv
Editorial Policy
xliii
Lakota Phonology and Pronunciation
xlix
Introduction by Josephine Waggoner
3
DakotaLakota Ethnography Culture and Society
13
The Origin of Fire by Makhúla
19
Miwátani Hänska Tall Mandan
337
Zintkálakinyán Swift Bird
339
Mathó Tópa Four Bear
341
Singleskásápa Black Spotted Horse
343
Itázipčho Sans
347
Waanatan Charger
349
Khangi Wiyaka Crow Feather
352
Héwanzíča One Horn
353

Meaning of Names
59
The White Buffalo
65
The Mackinaw Mackinac Attack Near Burnt Wood Creek
71
The Wagon Box Fight
79
Grand RiverApple CreekStanding Rock c 187075
81
West to Powder River 1875
102
Standing Rock Winter 187576
113
Thahánská Thánka John Bruguier
120
Standing Rock and Montana 187678
127
The Surrender
144
Life on the Reservation
163
Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute 188188
177
Working with Missionaries 188889
194
Wounded Knee 189091
218
Stock Rustling on the Reservation
227
Married Life
233
Lives of the Chiefs and Other Biographies
239
Acknowledgments by Josephine Waggoner
240
Isānyathi Santee Dakota 1 Támahe the OneEyed Sioux
243
Ištáhba Sleepy Eye 2 47
247
Inkpadūta Scarlet Point
250
Thaoyátedúta Little Crow
279
Thiwakhān Holy House
287
IhánkthunwanIhánkthunwanna YanktonYanktonai
289
Phalániyaphápi Struck by the Ree
291
Thathánkapha Bull Head Sr
299
Nasūnathánka Big Head
301
Mathó Gnaskinyan Mad Bear
304
Chanhpilùta Red Tomahawk
308
Thathánkapha Lieutenant Henry Bull Head Jr
310
Thithunwan Teton Lakota
313
Sihāsapa Blackfeet 12 Wakutemani Shoots Walking
317
Mathó Wathákpe John Grass
320
Chantehi Goose
324
Chanté Phéta Fire Heart
328
Oóhenumpa Two Kettle 16 Mathó Thuēhuhu Bear Ribs
331
Wanbligleská Spotted Eagle
354
Mnikhówoźu Miniconjou 25 Magáska White Swan II
359
Tháhéahušté Lame Deer
362
Unphāngleská Spotted Elk Big Foot
365
Chanhãhake Hump
368
Magáska White Swan IV
371
Mathó Cíkala Little Bear
373
Kinyān Hiyāya Flying By
374
Thasunkezi Yellow Horse
376
Maštíněalagleská Spotted Rabbit
379
Hünkpapha Hunkpapa
381
Thathóka Ínyanke Running Antelope
383
Wičháhpi Máza Iron Star
393
Mathó Ité Bear Face
394
Thathánka iyotake Sitting Bull
396
Chetán Wakinyan Thunder Hawk
417
Phizi Gall
422
Thathánka Hégleská Spotted Horn Bull
427
Hohú Chanhpí Bone Club
429
Mathó Očínsića Cross Bear
430
Itänkasan Mathó Weasel Bear
431
ItéOmagážu Rain in the Face
435
Wanblihôta Gray Eagle
439
Heyókhahmi Real Buffalo
442
Oglála Oglala
445
Mahpiyaltita Red Cloud
447
Thastinke Khokiphapi They Are Afraid of His Horses
453
Thaćpičíkala Little Wound
456
Wašiću Thastinke American Horse II
459
Thastinke Witkó Crazy Horse
461
Thukímáza Iron Shell
465
Notes
587
Bibliography
703
Index
727
Copyright

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About the author (2013)

Emily Levine is an independent scholar and the editor of With My Own Eyes: A Lakota Woman Tells Her Peopleês History, by Susan Bordeaux Bettelyoun and Josephine Waggoner, available in a Bison Books edition.

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