George Washington, Volume 1

Front Cover
Houghton, Mifflin, 1889 - Presidents
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Page 50 - Labor to keep alive in your breast that little spark of celestial fire, called conscience.
Page 221 - I can assure those gentlemen that it is a much easier and less distressing thing to draw remonstrances in a comfortable room by a good fireside than to occupy a cold, bleak hill and sleep under frost and snow without clothes or blankets.
Page 173 - No man I believe ever had a greater choice of evils and less means to extricate himself from them. However, under a full persuasion of the justice of our cause, I cannot entertain an idea that it will finally sink, though it may remain for some time under a cloud.
Page 327 - I am much at a loss to conceive what part of my conduct could have given encouragement to an address which to me seems big with the greatest mischiefs that can befall my country. If I am not deceived in the knowledge of myself, you could not have found a person to whom your schemes are more disagreeable.
Page 293 - It would have been a less painful circumstance to me to have heard, that, in consequence of your non-compliance with their request, they had burned my house and laid the plantation in ruins.
Page 337 - Mr. President : The great events on which my resignation depended having at length taken place. I have now the honor of offering my sincere congratulations to Congress, arid of presenting myself before them to surrender into their hands the trust •committed to me, and to claim the indulgence of retiring from the service -of my country.
Page 87 - The supplicating tears of the women and moving. petitions of the men melt me into such deadly sorrow, that I solemnly declare, if I know my own mind, I could offer myself a willing sacrifice to the butchering enemy, provided that would contribute to the people's ease.
Page 124 - I will raise a thousand men, subsist them at my own expense, and march with them at their head for the relief of Boston.
Page 85 - Honored Madam: If it is in my power to avoid going to the Ohio again, I shall; but if the command is pressed upon me by the general voice of the country, and offered upon such terms as cannot be objected against, it would reflect dishonor on me to refuse it...
Page 269 - To me it will appear miraculous, if our affairs can maintain themselves much longer in their present train. If either the temper or the resources of the country will not admit of an alteration, we may expect soon to be reduced to the humiliating condition of seeing the cause of America, in America, upheld by foreign arms.

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