Gun Violence in America: The Struggle for Control

Front Cover
Northeastern University Press, 2001 - History - 394 pages
Few social issues have produced more exaggerated claims and contention among Americans than the struggle to control gun violence. Fueling the emotional fire in debates between firearm groups such as the National Rifle Association (NRA) and gun control advocates is the dispute over the importance of guns in American culture. Is the fondness for firearms truly part of a venerable American tradition, one to be observed with very few limits? In this fascinating inquiry, Alexander DeConde delves into the myths and politics regarding gun keeping, as well as the controversies over gun use, crime, and policing from the early days of the republic to the present.
DeConde explains why the United States, with all its resources, fails repeatedly to confine gun violence to the same low levels achieved by other advanced democracies.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
3
Origins and Precedents
7
The Colonial Record
17
Copyright

21 other sections not shown

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2001)

DeConde is Professor of History, Emeritus, at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

Bibliographic information